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Tom J

1184 Posts

Posted - 04/12/2010 :  21:43:02  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Wow, Paddy, that would give me nightmares! So glad that you get stopped in time.

Tom
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duane

370 Posts

Posted - 04/12/2010 :  22:03:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jim Plummer

I'm thinking that prior to Shopper's World which was a discount store there was another business in that building which was made up of individual vendors renting space.



Perhaps, but I have no recollection of that. Shopper's World is the company that built the building IIRC. However, once Shopper's World failed, there was a type of flea market there, and later individual smaller stores. I always wondered why Shopper's World needed a water tower, which would believe one to believe that perhaps there was some sort of industrial factory there, but again, IIRC Shopper's World built the water tower predominantly as an advertising sign, high enough that it could be seen from a long way North and South on Indy Blvd.
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HassoBenSoba

USA
642 Posts

Posted - 04/13/2010 :  00:18:33  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I worked as a sales/floor guy at the River Oaks Kroch's and Brentano's off and on from 1973-77. I think I was paid $2 an hour; no----correction---it was $2.10.

Bob K. is right - River Oaks was the beginning of the end for downtown Hammond. The city's business district was able to withstand the competition from the Woodmar Shopping Center and the stores in Highland...but not R.O. I recall when it opened in the fall of '66, shopping at R.O. was "the" thing to do for all of my classmates at Noll. All part of the post-WWII move away from the big cities and into the suburbs.

Paddy-- a well-told story about your trucking experience; I was on the edge of my seat.

Edited by - HassoBenSoba on 04/13/2010 14:08:18
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wvcogs

USA
559 Posts

Posted - 04/13/2010 :  16:10:53  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jim Z


I think this is my 2nd post on here...just joined yesterday thanks to the Tomster. I have fond memories of River Oaks when it first opened (Ok shoot me...lol). Actually it was a beautiful open air mall. Didn't they have a Kroch and Bretano's Book Store? Anyhoo, I remember in the late 1960s going to free sumer concerts at night on I think Tuesdays and sitting on the steps somewhere in the middle of the mall....I guess it was a marketing ploy but it has stuck with me all of these years. Best, jim
Jim Zacny

I remember going to one concert there in the late '60s with my wife and oldest son. I believe it was Count Basie and his orchestra, and it was held in the parking lot on the east side of the shopping center. Does anyone remember that?
Ken O'Neal
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Jim Z

USA
11 Posts

Posted - 04/13/2010 :  19:19:06  Show Profile  Click to see Jim Z's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote

I think a lot of us have "what ifs"? Thanks for sharing your story. My what if...I will tell briefly but it haunts me to this day...what if? I am divorced now but at the time (15 years ago) I was married and my wife had tried to start a computer training biz at our home in Highland and it did not work out (she is highly successful now and am very happy for her) but she had a big Xerox copier in the "training room." One of our sons wanted the room for a bedroom so we were going the copier contraption to the basement. I got a dolly but am a nerd...I do not know how to wrap things with dollys (like the U-Haul ones)...and I did a half-baked job. So we were going to put it in the basement. So my older son and my wife were on on the third step of the basement stairs supposedly guiding this big monstrosity that was in FRONT of them..while I was BEHIND it with the dolly and after the first step had 200 pounds of weight on me and I knew I was going to lose it...and I said STOP...my mind is a bit fuzzy after that....I may have told them to get out of the way...but I pulled with all of my stength to get that Xerox machine back on the main floor. I coulda killed my wife and one of my sons. On one Saturday morning just trying to get a room ready for one of my sons so it could be his bedroom. The stuff that tragic accidents are made out of...in retrospect I could not believe I would have been so stupid...anyhoo, am rambling. They are alive and well and happy campers!

quote:
Originally posted by Paddy

[quote]Originally posted by Tom J

I remember a Tittle's on Hohman across from Harrison Park./quote]
Yep. It was kitty corner from the library on the south end of Harrison Park.

I worked at that Tittle's during my Sophomore and Junior years at Bishop Noll. Thinking back to those days, I remember an incident that could have completely changed my life.

After bagging groceries and stocking shelves, I graduated to the produce department. Tittle's got their produce from a Hammond wholesaler who sent a truck to the Water Street produce market twice a week to pick up produce for the five Tittle's stores. Being an adventurous kid, I asked the driver if I could ride with him and see what the Water Street market looked like. He left at 3 AM, but the Hammond store was his first stop and I reckoned that I could get back in time for school.

On the appointed day, I arrived at the wholesalers to ride along, only to find that the driver had failed to show up. The owner looked at me and asked, "Can you drive this truck?" Having just turned 16, my driver's license was a mere three months old. But I had learned to drive on a stick shift car, and I figured that the truck was just a larger version of my brother-in-law's Nash Rambler where he taught me to drive. So I said,"Sure."

I got the thing into first gear and pulled out of the garage like I knew what I was doing, and the subsequent gear grinding occurred after I was out of earshot. There was no traffic at that time of morning, and I feeling like an experienced trucker by the time I got onto State Street and proceeded north.

My experience at the Water Street market is a story unto itself, but the potential life-changing event occurred on my way back to Hammond.

Being an "experienced trucker" when I arrived at the market, I figured that the trip back would be even easier. But I had no idea about how a truck loaded with 16 tons of produce changed the braking distance.

As I was driving south on State Street, I approached a red light and began braking - just as a school crossing guard was sending a group of grade school kids into my path. I jammed the brakes as hard as I could. Fortunately, I stopped before I hit anyone, but I was close enough that the kids had literally disappeared from my vision over the hood.

I lucked out that day. I got the truck back to the Tittle's on Hohman and the produce wholesaler had a replacement driver to finish the route. But when I recall that moment, I wonder what would have happened to my life if I had crashed into those kids.



Jim Zacny
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Jim Z

USA
11 Posts

Posted - 04/13/2010 :  19:25:07  Show Profile  Click to see Jim Z's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Kroch's was a great bookstore (and the one in Chicago..omg). It was the last independent bookstore in NW Indiana. Kroch's had a special first edition club...I may have one of them. But it was a well respected bookstore as you know HBS!


quote:
Originally posted by HassoBenSoba

I worked as a sales/floor guy at the River Oaks Kroch's and Brentano's off and on from 1973-77. I think I was paid $2 an hour; no----correction---it was $2.10.

Bob K. is right - River Oaks was the beginning of the end for downtown Hammond. The city's business district was able to withstand the competition from the Woodmar Shopping Center and the stores in Highland...but not R.O. I recall when it opened in the fall of '66, shopping at R.O. was "the" thing to do for all of my classmates at Noll. All part of the post-WWII move away from the big cities and into the suburbs.

Paddy-- a well-told story about your trucking experience; I was on the edge of my seat.



Jim Zacny
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Jim Z

USA
11 Posts

Posted - 04/13/2010 :  19:30:00  Show Profile  Click to see Jim Z's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote

I may have been there...it rings a bell but then of course Count Basie in general rings a bell. You live in WV...I got my grad degree at WVU and saw some parts of wild wonderful WV. But my heart is out for the miner's families....

quote:
Originally posted by wvcogs

quote:
Originally posted by Jim Z


I think this is my 2nd post on here...just joined yesterday thanks to the Tomster. I have fond memories of River Oaks when it first opened (Ok shoot me...lol). Actually it was a beautiful open air mall. Didn't they have a Kroch and Bretano's Book Store? Anyhoo, I remember in the late 1960s going to free sumer concerts at night on I think Tuesdays and sitting on the steps somewhere in the middle of the mall....I guess it was a marketing ploy but it has stuck with me all of these years. Best, jim
Jim Zacny

I remember going to one concert there in the late '60s with my wife and oldest son. I believe it was Count Basie and his orchestra, and it was held in the parking lot on the east side of the shopping center. Does anyone remember that?
Ken O'Neal



Jim Zacny
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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 04/14/2010 :  08:23:22  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I remember EDI. You could spend hours and find amazing tubes and parts in there. I worked in a tv shop part time around the corner from it and we were always getting parts there.I remember seeing Rick Nelson and The Stone Canyon Band at River Oaks one Summer evening. You guys are right it was River Oaks that killed downtown. I think the close proximity was also a factor. And you could avoid railroad tracks if you came in from the south.
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Joel357

USA
120 Posts

Posted - 04/14/2010 :  10:04:46  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yeah, my dad/grandfather were good friends with Neal(Snuffy)and our shop was at 7331 Calumet til 1980 when we moved to Munster.
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Jim Z

USA
11 Posts

Posted - 04/22/2010 :  16:38:40  Show Profile  Click to see Jim Z's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote

Yes I remember EDI...wasn't it next to the stamp and coin store on Calumet Avenue?


quote:
Originally posted by Joel357

Jim Z, there was a Kroch and Brentanos at River Oaks and me being from a technical family, we used to go to Allied Radio. Anyone remember EDI? Neil Barry owned it.



Jim Zacny
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Joel357

USA
120 Posts

Posted - 04/22/2010 :  17:00:07  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes Jim Z, I believe across from Edison School

Joel
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Paddy

USA
136 Posts

Posted - 04/22/2010 :  21:07:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jim Plummer

You guys are right it was River Oaks that killed downtown.
I respectfully disagree. River Oaks and Woodmar Shopping Center were not the causes of downtown Hammond's decline. Rather, they were a result of the real cause, automobiles.

If you were to see an aerial view of Hammond in the 1930's-1950's, you would see block after block of homes without garages. The bulk of Hammond residents were working class folks, and very few of them owned cars. We lived at 4842 Beech Street until I was 10 years old, and I recall that only four familes in the two-block stretch between Hoffman and 150th owned cars.

Like the majority of Hammondites, my parents used their feet or the bus line to get to work, grocery stores, the doctor, etc. My father did not get a drivers license until after I did at age sixteen (1956).

At the same time that auto ownership in Hammond was increasing, passenger train travel was decreasing. The rail freight yards and their switch engines became the new culprit of RR crossing delays.

The Hammond city fathers responded to the clash between cars and clogged railway crossings by constructing more viaducts. By that time, it was too late to save downtown Hammond from the societal changes that the automobile brought to all of our neighborhoods.
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HassoBenSoba

USA
642 Posts

Posted - 04/22/2010 :  22:22:01  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Reminds me of my favorite dialogue from "Fiddler on the Roof". Three guys are arguing and the wise Tevye is listening. The 1st guy makes his point; Tevye comments: "He's right". Then the 2nd guy makes his point, which directly contradicts the 1st guy; Tevye responds: "He's right, too." So the 3rd guy interrupts and asks Tevye:" He's right? and He's right?...How can they both be right??", to which Tevye calmly responds: "You know, you are also right...."

The point is--we're ALL correct about this; the entire dynamic of society changed after the War. The new sense of optimism and financial opportunity for all of the young families that had grown up in the depression resulted in tons of new cars sold, which made it possible for people to move away from the cities and into new houses that made up the new suburbs. And once the population had expanded into the suburbs, it was only a matter of time 'til the city's big stores followed them out to the suburbs, in the form of shopping centers (Woodmar in 1954, Shopper's World in 1960, etc). So it was one, continuous set of circumstances that all "fed off" of one another.

STILL, downtown Hammond was able to hold its own (the big new Rothchild's store opened downtwon as late as April, 1965)--until River Oaks opened in 1966. So, in a very real way, R.O. was the beginning of the end, the final blow, the big nail in the coffin of the city.

LR

Edited by - HassoBenSoba on 04/23/2010 10:33:54
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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 04/23/2010 :  09:07:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ok so there were two EDI's. We had an electronic parts store in Hessville named EDI. It was just off Kennedy Ave and was massive.
quote:
Originally posted by Jim Z


Yes I remember EDI...wasn't it next to the stamp and coin store on Calumet Avenue?


quote:
Originally posted by Joel357

Jim Z, there was a Kroch and Brentanos at River Oaks and me being from a technical family, we used to go to Allied Radio. Anyone remember EDI? Neil Barry owned it.



Jim Zacny

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Jay

144 Posts

Posted - 04/23/2010 :  09:24:33  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Paddy

quote:
Originally posted by Jim Plummer

You guys are right it was River Oaks that killed downtown.
I respectfully disagree. River Oaks and Woodmar Shopping Center were not the causes of downtown Hammond's decline. Rather, they were a result of the real cause, automobiles.

If you were to see an aerial view of Hammond in the 1930's-1950's, you would see block after block of homes without garages. The bulk of Hammond residents were working class folks, and very few of them owned cars. We lived at 4842 Beech Street until I was 10 years old, and I recall that only four familes in the two-block stretch between Hoffman and 150th owned cars.

Like the majority of Hammondites, my parents used their feet or the bus line to get to work, grocery stores, the doctor, etc. My father did not get a drivers license until after I did at age sixteen (1956).

At the same time that auto ownership in Hammond was increasing, passenger train travel was decreasing. The rail freight yards and their switch engines became the new culprit of RR crossing delays.

The Hammond city fathers responded to the clash between cars and clogged railway crossings by constructing more viaducts. By that time, it was too late to save downtown Hammond from the societal changes that the automobile brought to all of our neighborhoods.



You summed up the demise of downtown Hammond in the most probable way as far as I'm concerned. Also, I can think of two more influences:

#1 - The Hammond busses went on strike, and that put them out of business.

#2 - Regarding the River Oaks and Woodmar shopping malls, didn't they have more of an impact after they enclosed their malls?

Edited by - Jay on 04/23/2010 09:39:15
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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 04/24/2010 :  08:59:30  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I think they had an impact from day one. I think the free parking and lack of trains made the big difference. My mother wouldn't pay the extra sales tax in Ill. but Woodmar was very conveinient for shopping. Minas's even had a River Oaks store.
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Larry51

1 Posts

Posted - 05/02/2010 :  21:45:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey people!! There was a TITTLES Store at the Shoppers World building. It was run as a separate store. On the EAST end of the main building. It was known for the meats.
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Tom J

1184 Posts

Posted - 05/03/2010 :  06:32:55  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Welcome, Larry51! Glad you have joined us.

Tom
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tom w

USA
316 Posts

Posted - 05/10/2010 :  04:33:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
There was an EDI in the old Krogers on Chicago Avenue in East Chicago as well. Tom W
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Joel357

USA
120 Posts

Posted - 05/10/2010 :  07:28:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tom W,

Was that where Acro Electronics was? East of Bishop Noll?

Joel
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tom w

USA
316 Posts

Posted - 05/10/2010 :  11:06:14  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I stand corrected. You are absolutely correct. Thank you. Tom W
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Jim

46 Posts

Posted - 05/12/2010 :  14:06:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here is a link to a Google Earth map of Hessville with many of our old haunts marked. Feel free to look around, and use the street view to see how it is today. Numerous photos from here and elswhere have been included. Email or post new locations you would like added or if you have any corrections.

http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&ie=UTF8&msa=0&msid=102416397245968856895.00048657955f700376bd4&ll=41.604661,-87.466879&spn=0.046145,0.076818&t=h&z=14

Edited by - Jim on 05/16/2010 06:42:37
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wvcogs

USA
559 Posts

Posted - 05/15/2010 :  21:38:39  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Julian Rasmussen in the Dairy Queen photo!!! He was my favorite teacher even though I never had him for a class. This must have been an ad in one of the Top Hat yearbooks.
Good work Jim.
Ken
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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 05/17/2010 :  18:54:07  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
anybody know the two students in the photo with Mr R?
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Jim

46 Posts

Posted - 05/17/2010 :  19:02:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That would be Marty Olsen and Jerry Farster.
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Jim

46 Posts

Posted - 05/17/2010 :  20:59:10  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Would anyone want to venture a guess as to who these 2 young ladies are?
Hint: Their stepfather used to pick them up after school in a white convertible with the top down.

http://i839.photobucket.com/albums/zz316/jamesbucko/Hessville/Guess.jpg
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HassoBenSoba

USA
642 Posts

Posted - 05/18/2010 :  20:46:42  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by wvcogs

Julian Rasmussen in the Dairy Queen photo!!! He was my favorite teacher even though I never had him for a class. This must have been an ad in one of the Top Hat yearbooks.
Good work Jim.
Ken



Since we've got another Julian Rasmussen thing going here, I'll post his pic from the Morton Top-Hat, 1968-69. I shudder to think of what it is he's working on here....
LR

Edited by - HassoBenSoba on 05/18/2010 20:48:48
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 05/18/2010 :  22:03:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Larry, for the wonderful photo of Mr. Rasmussen! Not sure exactly what animal that is in the dissecting tray.

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63
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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2010 :  07:56:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great photo! I'm guessing it's a rat. Mr. R's warm personality sure come through in that photo
Thanks Jim for answering my last question!
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Jim

46 Posts

Posted - 05/22/2010 :  21:16:14  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Next clue:

They are sisters, Paulette and Georgette.

quote:
Originally posted by Jim

Would anyone want to venture a guess as to who these 2 young ladies are?
Hint: Their stepfather used to pick them up after school in a white convertible with the top down.

http://i839.photobucket.com/albums/zz316/jamesbucko/Hessville/Guess.jpg

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Jim

46 Posts

Posted - 05/28/2010 :  10:51:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The Paulsin girls attended Morton High School in 1962 and 1963. And, they were picked up after school by their step-father JEAN SHEPARD.
quote:
Originally posted by Jim

Next clue:

They are sisters, Paulette and Georgette.

quote:
Originally posted by Jim

Would anyone want to venture a guess as to who these 2 young ladies are?
Hint: Their stepfather used to pick them up after school in a white convertible with the top down.

http://i839.photobucket.com/albums/zz316/jamesbucko/Hessville/Guess.jpg




Edited by - Jim on 05/29/2010 19:41:35
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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 05/29/2010 :  09:34:58  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wasn't there also a George Paulsen about 1963, who appeared in 'Simon, King Of The Witches'?
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Jim

46 Posts

Posted - 05/29/2010 :  19:39:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes he was. The following is from IMDB.com and would indicate that Jean may have been the uncle, not the stepfather.

"George Paulsin is the son of singer Dee Shepherd. His sisters are Georgette Mossbacher (CEO of Borghese Cosmetics and co-chair of the Finance Committee the Republican National Committee. Other sisters are model Lyn Paulsin and Melody Dwyer. Their father George Paulsin died in a 1959 automobile crash. His stepfather Randy Shepherd is the brother of writer Jean Shepherd."

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Thawk9632

USA
27 Posts

Posted - 06/01/2010 :  18:21:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by nitti

quote:
Originally posted by Jim Plummer

I know this sounds strange, but I've never been in there. I assume its just a neighborhood bar; is it? Is there anything that indicates its place in Shep history? As a matter of fact, I never went to any of the taverns in Hessville. When I was at Purdue extension we use to go to the Rose & Crown in Cal City and the bar in the bowling alley at 165th and Columbia ave.
quote:
Originally posted by Joel357

As a Purdue Cal student, my friends and I used to go to Flicks evry so often.



Unfortunately the original Flick's is boarded up - after it moved north into a buiding that once housed a little restaurant called the "Nook", the original site went through a series of reincarnations known mostly for violence and mayhem. After the last shooting, it was closed down - possibly never to re-open.

This is thawk9632 i remember when the Nook was called the Huddle Restuarant,accross the street from The Idle Hour Lounge
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Thawk9632

USA
27 Posts

Posted - 06/01/2010 :  18:30:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by James Hunt

Very fun site, brought back a lot of great memories, thanks to all those that have contributed.

I grew up in Hessville on California Avenue very near Hessville Park, lived there from 1956 until 1973.

Summers were the best times. Would leave the house in the morning and not come back until dinner. I would often get a dime from my mom and go to the Hessville Park pool. Does anyone remember those baskets you would keep your street clothes in and the metal pin you would pin to your bathing suit with the basket number on it?Hi Iam thawk962,Yes i do remember it well,i used to take the pins and switch baskets,and what we did with the Baby Ruth candy bars,let them float in the water and the girls used to scream,and snap towels at the other kids,what a blast of the past

Jim Hunt
OLPH 67
Morton 71 (just barely LOL)

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Thawk9632

USA
27 Posts

Posted - 06/03/2010 :  10:44:44  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by S C Jones

Hello from Tennessee. This is a great site and one I have been longing to find.
---I was born at St. Margarets in 1940. My dad, a tin-roll builder at Youngstown Sheet and Tube, raised me and my brothers as a single parent in Grand Park subdivision of Hessville.

Mr. Fifield of the Rexall Drug Store called us and our neighborhood friends, "The kids from the boondocks." Grand Avenue at that time was almost the city limit before you hit Black Oak at Cline Avenue. (Black Oak was without a city--unincorporated and serviced by Gary.

I attended 6th grade ( -1952) at Morton elementary because I lived with a sister and her family on 169th just west of Kennedy Ave. between the Pow Wow Drive In and Ferris Standard Oil Service Station. The house we lived in there was rented to us by Ferris. That house had been a dance hall in the 30's and 40's called The Rendevous---It was a long shaped stucco sided building with rounded ends that had around 12 windows in each end.

The Bluebird Tap/Tavern across from Ferris' Station was Boland's Tap. As a 5 year old, I lived with the Boland's in the back of that Tavern--My dad had to take me back home to live when I walked out into the bar area to take a nickel offered by one of the Grand Park neighbor men and someone reported the incident to Child Welfare!

BTW-anyone remember the quaint little Conoco station on 169th just east of Kennedy? The last I knew, it had an addition and was a sandwich place.

I moved back to Grand Park to live with my father and brothers in 1953 and attended Oliver Perry Morton High School until graduation in 1958.

My 2nd grade (1947) was spent in the Parish School on Parish and 173rd (Where now stands Caldwell Elementary). Parish was a wooden school house and probably was built around the same time as the original Harding--perhaps a bit later, because the neighborhood I lived in began to build up around 1940--my dad helped to build our house. That school burned sometime before 1951 or 2 and the students from Parish had to attend Harding elementary for sometime.

One of you wrote:One subject I haven't seen broached is teachers. At Morton High Albert Clark was the principle. 9th hour dicipinarian was named Ruff and he taught Latin. Miss Virden taught English. Mr. Flansburg taught algebra. Maury Zlotnik was the football coach. Other names: Chidester, Hand, Groves, Melton.

My mother, an american born to Russian immigrants, had Albert Clark as her principal, as did I. I had Chidester for math and Virden for English. I remember Zlotnick and Melton--Morton had award-winning bands under his direction.

The Emporium was the place to go for those big pretzels and the candy Kits as well as your paper and pencils. The Hitching Post had a great hamburger, since the Pow Wow was not open in the winter and you couldn't get their best of the best Tomato Burger.

Do any of you remember the Stouts--She substitute taught bookkeeping, and he may have been a track coach or science teacher? Oh, and Mr Harper—Biology teacher, Miss Coble—English, Miss Lockhart—Geography, and Mrs Byers was my high school homeroom teacher.
I think she taught History.

Hansen Library, I can still remember the smell of that place. I started getting books there in 1952. My bike had to have a basket so I could check out books at the library.

Was Gregory's an IGA? on the corner of 173rd and Kennedy? My dad called it the Iggy!

I did not discover Cande's Pizza until it had moved to 165th--and after I left "Da Region"
to attend college, I always went back to Cande's for an Itallian Beef---no one nowwhere, at no time has made a more delicious Italian Beef.

My first job out of high school was in Hessville at Girman and Glegg Realty, on the West side and North a bit of the Ace Theater. Then I took a job with Graybar Electric Company on the north end of Indianapolis Blvd.

I worked one summer at Kelly's Drive In (Indianapolis and 169th) owned by Nicholas Kikolas; his brother, Peter Kikolas owned a restaurant on Kennedy Ave. I think.
After my freshman year in college, I worked a summer at the PowWow!--Somehow the glamor it had held when I was younger, had faded by then--not the food, the position as a car hop!!!

Does anyone remember the Nehi Bottiling Co. Building that was just North (it set back from Kennedy and was across the vacant lot behind the Dairy Queen.

Does anyone know anyone from the 1958 graduating class of OPMH? I would like to be included in any up-coming Fiftieth Reunion.... GOVENORS RULE!

I'm gonna stop for now--anyone who begins reading this will need some time.




Grand Park Subdivision 1940-1961 Boondocks of Hessville!

I worked there it was called the grapette bottling co.before they changed to Nehi,My brother and i,he was also born in 1940 by Lost Park,iwas born in 43.
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S C Jones

USA
438 Posts

Posted - 06/03/2010 :  17:32:56  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
So, did the sign on the building read NEHI or GRAPETTE? S.C. Jones
quote:
Originally posted by Thawk9632

quote:
Originally posted by S C Jones

Hello from Tennessee. This is a great site and one I have been longing to find.
---I was born at St. Margarets in 1940. My dad, a tin-roll builder at Youngstown Sheet and Tube, raised me and my brothers as a single parent in Grand Park subdivision of Hessville.

Mr. Fifield of the Rexall Drug Store called us and our neighborhood friends, "The kids from the boondocks." Grand Avenue at that time was almost the city limit before you hit Black Oak at Cline Avenue. (Black Oak was without a city--unincorporated and serviced by Gary.

I attended 6th grade ( -1952) at Morton elementary because I lived with a sister and her family on 169th just west of Kennedy Ave. between the Pow Wow Drive In and Ferris Standard Oil Service Station. The house we lived in there was rented to us by Ferris. That house had been a dance hall in the 30's and 40's called The Rendevous---It was a long shaped stucco sided building with rounded ends that had around 12 windows in each end.

The Bluebird Tap/Tavern across from Ferris' Station was Boland's Tap. As a 5 year old, I lived with the Boland's in the back of that Tavern--My dad had to take me back home to live when I walked out into the bar area to take a nickel offered by one of the Grand Park neighbor men and someone reported the incident to Child Welfare!

BTW-anyone remember the quaint little Conoco station on 169th just east of Kennedy? The last I knew, it had an addition and was a sandwich place.

I moved back to Grand Park to live with my father and brothers in 1953 and attended Oliver Perry Morton High School until graduation in 1958.

My 2nd grade (1947) was spent in the Parish School on Parish and 173rd (Where now stands Caldwell Elementary). Parish was a wooden school house and probably was built around the same time as the original Harding--perhaps a bit later, because the neighborhood I lived in began to build up around 1940--my dad helped to build our house. That school burned sometime before 1951 or 2 and the students from Parish had to attend Harding elementary for sometime.

One of you wrote:One subject I haven't seen broached is teachers. At Morton High Albert Clark was the principle. 9th hour dicipinarian was named Ruff and he taught Latin. Miss Virden taught English. Mr. Flansburg taught algebra. Maury Zlotnik was the football coach. Other names: Chidester, Hand, Groves, Melton.

My mother, an american born to Russian immigrants, had Albert Clark as her principal, as did I. I had Chidester for math and Virden for English. I remember Zlotnick and Melton--Morton had award-winning bands under his direction.

The Emporium was the place to go for those big pretzels and the candy Kits as well as your paper and pencils. The Hitching Post had a great hamburger, since the Pow Wow was not open in the winter and you couldn't get their best of the best Tomato Burger.

Do any of you remember the Stouts--She substitute taught bookkeeping, and he may have been a track coach or science teacher? Oh, and Mr Harper—Biology teacher, Miss Coble—English, Miss Lockhart—Geography, and Mrs Byers was my high school homeroom teacher.
I think she taught History.

Hansen Library, I can still remember the smell of that place. I started getting books there in 1952. My bike had to have a basket so I could check out books at the library.

Was Gregory's an IGA? on the corner of 173rd and Kennedy? My dad called it the Iggy!

I did not discover Cande's Pizza until it had moved to 165th--and after I left "Da Region"
to attend college, I always went back to Cande's for an Itallian Beef---no one nowwhere, at no time has made a more delicious Italian Beef.

My first job out of high school was in Hessville at Girman and Glegg Realty, on the West side and North a bit of the Ace Theater. Then I took a job with Graybar Electric Company on the north end of Indianapolis Blvd.

I worked one summer at Kelly's Drive In (Indianapolis and 169th) owned by Nicholas Kikolas; his brother, Peter Kikolas owned a restaurant on Kennedy Ave. I think.
After my freshman year in college, I worked a summer at the PowWow!--Somehow the glamor it had held when I was younger, had faded by then--not the food, the position as a car hop!!!

Does anyone remember the Nehi Bottiling Co. Building that was just North (it set back from Kennedy and was across the vacant lot behind the Dairy Queen.

Does anyone know anyone from the 1958 graduating class of OPMH? I would like to be included in any up-coming Fiftieth Reunion.... GOVENORS RULE!

I'm gonna stop for now--anyone who begins reading this will need some time.




Grand Park Subdivision 1940-1961 Boondocks of Hessville!

I worked there it was called the grapette bottling co.before they changed to Nehi,My brother and i,he was also born in 1940 by Lost Park,iwas born in 43.


Edited by - S C Jones on 06/03/2010 17:33:45
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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 06/04/2010 :  08:31:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm not sure it had a sign; at least on the Kennedy side. Didn't it front the street behind kennedy?
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S C Jones

USA
438 Posts

Posted - 06/04/2010 :  09:46:45  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Jim, the sign I meant to inquire about was painted on the south side of the building that was just across (north of the dairy queen)--As I remember it there was an empty lot or a parking lot between the DQ and that building.

quote:
Originally posted by Jim Plummer

I'm not sure it had a sign; at least on the Kennedy side. Didn't it front the street behind kennedy?



Grand Park Subdivision 1940-1961 Boondocks of Hessville!
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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 06/05/2010 :  09:04:53  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
They must have removed it early because I had pretty much forgotten it. I just remember those expansive crushed rock parking lots.
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musicluvrdon

4 Posts

Posted - 08/17/2010 :  13:08:07  Show Profile  Click to see musicluvrdon's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
I have been a Hammond resident my entire life! I was born in March of 1959, in north Hammond, the youngest of three sons. I was raised on the corner of Elm and Huehn Streets, and I have so many great childhood memories of friends from childhood...some I've reconnected with on Facebook. Those were great days, going to Irving Elementary, Spohn Middle, and Clark High School. Life was great back then, when the city bus service was active, and downtown Hammond was bustling with activity! It would be great to go back down memory lane and relive those times again! Since 1979, I have lived in south Hammond, Hessville, and currently living in south Hammond....great times!
Hammond, Indiana...my home!!

Don H.
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Tom J

1184 Posts

Posted - 08/17/2010 :  13:45:49  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Hey, Don! Welcome to Sheptalk!

I know you are going to enjoy this place. All of us here share your love for the Hammond of old.

Tom
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RichK

3 Posts

Posted - 08/21/2010 :  23:25:56  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just found this forum. My grandparents lived at 41 Elizabeth. Grandpa owned Paxton Lumber. Dad went to Hammond High, graduated around 1947 or so. My brother was born at St. Margaret's. I was born in 1956 when the family was moving around, ended up growing up mostly in Munster. Worked at Paxton during the summer. Moved to Hammond after high school. Lived on Ruth street, then Waltham. That's my connections to Hammond. Came out to Colorado in 1984.

Enjoy looking through the forum, brings back lots of memories. Here is a picture of me with my brother. This was taken somewhere in Hammond, 1961.



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Tom J

1184 Posts

Posted - 08/22/2010 :  07:25:20  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Rich, for telling us a little bit about yourself.

I sure hope you plan to stick around and be part of the Sheptalk family of "Region Rats."

Thanks for sharing the picture of you and your brother on the old steam loco.

Keep posting!

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!

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Roger D

237 Posts

Posted - 08/22/2010 :  09:16:57  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey Rich that pic could have been taken across from the Hammond Civic Center. Great to have those memories.
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Tom J

1184 Posts

Posted - 08/22/2010 :  11:19:49  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Roger D

Hey Rich that pic could have been taken across from the Hammond Civic Center. Great to have those memories.



If it was, it was a different engine than the one that is there now.

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!

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RichK

3 Posts

Posted - 08/22/2010 :  11:20:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The current locomotive at the Civic Center is different. I think at some point the city replaced the one in the picture with the one that is there now.
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Roger D

237 Posts

Posted - 08/22/2010 :  17:50:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Rich, Tom knows his trains, he is a RR nut. Hey Tom have you ever been to the RR museum at North Judson, In.? We were by there in April but they are only open in the summer.
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Tom J

1184 Posts

Posted - 08/22/2010 :  19:42:02  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Roger D

Rich, Tom knows his trains, he is a RR nut. Hey Tom have you ever been to the RR museum at North Judson, In.? We were by there in April but they are only open in the summer.



Have not been there, Roger.

The only RR museum I have been to is the Illinois Railway Museum in Union, IL. It was fantastic!

Tomster
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tom pancheri

6 Posts

Posted - 09/21/2010 :  23:31:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was born and raise in South Hammond. I lived there from 1949 to 1974. Can someone tell me where Cudahy was and what the story about the Cudahy ghost was? Tom Pancheri
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