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HassoBenSoba

USA
642 Posts

Posted - 06/24/2010 :  01:35:01  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The Three Stooges remain a true phenomenom in American pop culture; their "staying power" is AMAZING! Why is this, I wonder?

For anyone interested, here's some background---
During the glory years of Hollywood, every studio (MGM, Warner's, Paramount, etc) was like a little, self-contained city that had it's own offices, sound-stages, equipment, actors, directors, designers, editors, orchestra, etc etc---AND a short-subject Department of some sort that produced comedies, cartoons, educational films, etc.. that were distributed as part of the package that went out to theatres nationwide; as you know, a film showing used to include a news-reel, cartoon, comedy short, etc...all of it provided by the studio that produced the feature film. So EVERY studio was making these short films.

Columbia studios, which produced the Stooges, also produced MANY OTHER comedy series--Andy Clyde, Vera Vague, Collins and Kennedy, Schilling and Lane, etc....most of whom are totally forgotten today. So, of ALL of the comedy teams that were active during the 30's and 40's, ONLY Laurel & Hardy and the Stooges have survived...and the Stooges's popularity definitely eclipses L&H. However, as the studio system began its post-war decline, they all shut down their short-subject departments. Columbia hung on as long as it could---Shemp Howard died in 1955, but Columbia decided to continue by replacing him with Joe Besser for two more years of films, before they, too, threw in the towel in late 1957.

Ironically, even though TV was largely responsible for killling off the studios and ending the Stooges' major career, TV ended up SAVING them! During the 50's, the studios desparately needed the income, so they decided to take all of their old films that were sitting in their vaults---films that were NEVER meant to be seen more than once in the theater and which would have probably been DESTROYED by the studios---and sold these films in packages to TV stations around the country who were all looking for kiddie programming to fill their afternoon time slots. Thus, in the fall of 1958, WGN TV in Chicago first started airing the Stooges' shorts, and my life has never been the same since! So the Stooges and their work were saved from oblivion--- they became a HUGE attraction (bigger than they had been in the 30's); they hired Joe DeRita ("Curly Joe"), and began to tour the country, make feature films, records and cartoons.

So let's see where this thread goes; it would be great to hear from anyone who really appreciates the Stooges, and the way in which they brought out that "nitwit/knucklehead" tendency in all of us; there's something about their low-brow humor that just seems to fit in perfectly with the blue-collar, strong work-ethic, fun-loving character of us denizens of da' Region.

Jay--please post the 1961 pic you have, and I'll do some stuff too.

"I am Hasso Ben Soba"! (Shemp: I've had a few too many myself....!)

Tom J

1185 Posts

Posted - 06/24/2010 :  06:17:33  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Larry! That's a great intro, and I thoroughly enjoyed reading it. Virtually all of the info in your post was new to me. I loved the Stooges, but I had never researched their history.

I'm looking forward to the continuation of this thread.

Tom
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diskojoe

161 Posts

Posted - 06/24/2010 :  09:57:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

I recently purchased Vol. 8 of the collected Stooges shorts & now have the entire set. The quality of the shorts are amazing. It's almost as if Ansel Adams made them. Another thing is that although the last volume features Joe Besser, the episodes that I've seen so far are actually funnier than I remember, although they don't have the transcendent quality of the Curly ones .

The Stooges are also popular up here in the Boston area. A Boston TV tradition is the Stooges New Year's marathon on WSBK Channel 38 which has been going on for around 30 yrs. now.

Finally, about 20 yrs. ago, I actually got to see the soundstage at the old Columbia Studios where the Stooges filmed their shorts while on a trip to SoCal. I was told that they had to film the shorts at night, since the daytime hours were reserved for the more "serious" films.

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cartoonguy

USA
73 Posts

Posted - 06/24/2010 :  19:49:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Boy, I can recall growing up in Hammond during the sixties and seventies when classic films were all over the dials, no cable or satellite in those days, just UHF and VHF, of course WGN ran the Three Stooges , but I fondly remember Saturdays you could find the Bowery Boys, Abbott and Costello, Creature Features, Marx Brothers, or W.C. Fields, while on Sundays Charlie Chan, Sherlock Holmes, Family Classics, Laurel and Hardy, and When Movies Were Movies, and that was just on the weekend. I have purchased almost all of these films on DVD; they meant so much to me back then, and they mean even more to me now.
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HassoBenSoba

USA
642 Posts

Posted - 06/25/2010 :  02:16:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey, disko--

Did you by any chance take a picture of that Columbia sound stage? I'd love to see it.

A few more thoughts
:

When the Stooges started their short films in 1934, the film industry was really booming. Their very first film was "Woman Haters"--the one that was a musical spoken all in rhyme. What's interesting is that this short was part of a SERIES that Columbia was producing at the time called "Musical Novelties; I have two other films of this series (NOT with the Stooges) and they're pretty lame.

Have you ever realized that the Stooges are just about the ONLY thing that kids of today will watch that's in Black and White? The Stooges films are actually quite EDUCATIONAL in the way that they present a "Chronicle" of American life and Pop culture. In their early films when they're out panhandling on the actual streets of L.A.-- that's the Great Depression, happening right before your eyes! During the War, when they spoofed Hitler, worked in munitions factories, etc --- there's the WWII War effort right before your eyes! After the war, in the late 40's, when the mood of the country turned rather dark, a lot of the Shemp films were crime drama/comedies; others were spoofs of Westerns, which were also extremely popular at the time. And as the studios started their decline in the '50's, you can actually see the effect of their low budgets---ALL shot on the same sound stage, with very little of the outdoor location shooting that they used to do in the 30's, when production was much cheaper.

A great "history" lesson!

Here's a QUIZ for us boomers: We all remember old "Andy Starr" on WGN, the caretaker of the make-believe "Odeon" Theater who used to bring in the mail, then sit down in his rocker and show us the stooge films on his projector.

Questions: (starting with the easiest)

1.) Who played "Andy Starr"? What other well-known TV character did he play?

2.) Andy Starr was NOT the first WGN-TV host to show the Stooge films; ANOTHER WGN guy actually hosted the Stooges show when they debuted on Chicago TV starting on October 6, 1958. Who was this original host? Who was his (non-human) "co-host"?

3.) Here's one that's totally off-the-charts---my late brother Mike and I happened to remember this, and I confirmed it a few years ago in the old Hammond Times microfilms at the Library:
Which Stooge film was the very first to be shown on WGN on Monday, October 6, 1958? (I'm just showing off, guys, by posting this one)..

First Prize is an all-expense paid trip to The Isle of Rum-Boogie.

Edited by - HassoBenSoba on 06/25/2010 13:53:12
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Jay

145 Posts

Posted - 06/25/2010 :  03:24:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was having trouble sleeping tonight so I thought I would check out this forum. And look what I found!

Wow HassoBenSoba, I am impressed with the background information you have provided in creating this thread. I thought I knew about the Three Stooges, but you put me to shame.

I got interested in the Three Stooges thanks to WGN-TV back in the late 1950's. I watched Andy Starr play their films from his Odeum Theater. I also remember the Andy Clyde films.

The short films the Stooges made for Columbia varied from about 16 to 22 minutes in length. I believe they made about 190 with Curly, about 55 with Shemp, and about 8 with Joe Besser before Columbia stopped making them.

Then Moe's son-in-law became a film producer and suggested that the Stooges make feature length films. I don't remember if they formed their own production company or used a private company. Joe Besser could not continue because his wife was ailing. So they hired Joe DeRita as the third stooge.

The Stooges started making these full length films around 1960. To promote them, they would travel around the country and perform comedy routines. In 1961, they appeared on the west side of Chicago at an outdoor carnival, and performed inside a large circus tent that was set up like a theater. My father drove my sister and I to see them. Not only were we able to get copies of the standard promotional movie 8"x10" photo they passed out to everyone (with the stamped signatures), but after their performance, we cornered them outside the tent and got them to add their genuine autographs to the photos. And as they signed the photos, my father took polaroid photos as proof. I will post the photos here in a few days. I have to figure out where I put them.

My interest in the Three Stooges continued into my adult life. I watch their shorts whenever they appeared on television. And I read most of the books about them.

Regarding your trivia questions, I will answer just #2 for now.
I believe it was Carl Greyson (http://wgngold.com/people/greyson-carl.htm) who preceded Andy Starr in hosting the Stooges films. And I think he had a monkey sidekick.
After a week or two, if no one else answers the other questions, I'll answer them. I know the answer for #1. But as for #3, that will take a little research.


Edited by - Jay on 06/25/2010 03:55:19
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HassoBenSoba

USA
642 Posts

Posted - 06/25/2010 :  13:51:47  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
JAY--

BOING!! You are CORRECT on Question #2! It was indeed WGN's own Carl Greyson that first hosted the Stooges. Apparently, they had to pick whoever was available and willing to do the gig, since Carl was HARDLY the kind of kid-friendly host that most other stations around the country had (which is why, I assume, WGN changed the whole image of the host with Andy Starr the following year).

Carl Greyson was a rather dour kind of guy; many will remember his very sober newscasts on WGN's "Night Beat" report in the 70's; rumor was that, in fact, Carl may not have been entirely sober while doing some of those broadcasts. I spoke with him on the phone once in the late 70's; he remembered doing the Stooges, but was far more interested in telling me about his first-hand experience sitting in the studio audience for Orson Welles' historic live radio broadcast of "The War of the Worlds" in October, 1938. Apparently, Greyson was in N.Y. studying theater, acting, etc at that time.

You are ALSO correct about Carl's "MONKEY SIDEKICK" on his daily Stooges broadcasts; "Chatter" as he was called, joined Carl in little lame skits which somebody dreamed up to fill the time while the film was not running. Incidentally, the show ran only a half-hour in 1958; that meant only ONE Stooge film was shown per day, with rest of the time being taken up with commericials and/or the hilarious hi-jinks of Carl and "Chatter".

NOTE: There's an excellent book entitled "The Golden Age of Chicago Children's Television" by Ted Okuda. On page 20, he recounts a shocking story in which Carl Greyson, who occasionally had local Chicago people on his Stooge broadcast to fill the time, had a woman who owned a parakeet who did tricks on camera. According to the book, "Chatter" grabbed the bird off the lady's finger, bit its head off, and then plopped the headless carcass back into her hand (!) According to Okuda: "As his guest crumpled to the floor, a stunned Greyson stared at his partner [the monkey], and the station cut quickly to a commerical."

Ya can't beat the fun on live TV!

Looking forward to your 1961 Stooges pics!

Edited by - HassoBenSoba on 06/25/2010 13:52:12
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Tom J

1185 Posts

Posted - 06/25/2010 :  15:26:42  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
A severe case of professional jealousy on Chatter's part?
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diskojoe

161 Posts

Posted - 06/25/2010 :  21:52:15  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
HassoBenSoba sez:

"Hey, disko--

Did you by any chance take a picture of that Columbia sound stage? I'd love to see it."

I didn't, it was just an empty old soundstage. You're right about how the Stooges can be educational.

I was watching two Shemps from Vol.7 w/my friend tonight, "Cuckoo On A Choo Choo" (w/Larry doing his Brando impersonation) & "A Missed Fortune" (a redo of a Curly one).

Have any of you guys ever watched Svengoolie? I've watched a bunch of them via tape & enjoyed them.


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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 06/26/2010 :  08:43:37  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is really getting interesting! I would like to suggest that one of the reasons that the Stooges became popular with us is because of the love and affection the Stooges show for each other along with the physical attacks on each other. Kind of like Homer Simpson and Bart. They may be disfunctional but they are trying. I suppose the other reason is that none of the other series of shorts lasted so long as the Stooges. That meant that the package offered to tv stations was very substantial compared to say Vera Vague or
Andy Clyde.
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Jim R

61 Posts

Posted - 06/26/2010 :  11:05:28  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Does anyone remember seeing the Three Stooges Cartoon Show? Moe, Larry, and that whiny guy would do a short skit, and then show stooges cartoons. Thinking about it, I now have the shows theme song stuck in my head.

Harding K thru 7
Morton 8 thru 12
Class of 1972
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HassoBenSoba

USA
642 Posts

Posted - 06/26/2010 :  15:39:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
JIM(Plummer)...

I absolutely agree. There's something very appealing about the Stooges as 3 nutty but loveable guys...despite all of the violence. The Stooges are definitely a "guy" thing....most women I know can't stand them! I have tried to explain their appeal on a number of occasions...that the violence is a sort of "supernatural" quality to their cartoon-like personalitites; they never really get hurt, regardless of how much mayhem is dished out. Laurel and Hardy, though regarded as far more classy than the Stooges, were really more violent, in a way---since they were much more "real" guys, the violence that Oliver Hardy endured was really painful to watch.

I agree that the Stooges' longevity is due largely to the volume of their short films---190 in all...much more than any other comedy team produced. Andy Clyde was second at Columbia, but his films never really lasted; I own about 20 of them (that we used to see on WGN); they are really interesting, since they used all the same writers, directors, actors, etc as the Stooges---but who wants to watch a bumbling old hayseed get the hell beat out of him by everyone and everything around him? It's pretty crude stuff.

JIM R. --- Yeah, the cartoons were produced in the mid-60's by Norman Maurer, who (as Jay mentions above) was married to Moe's daughter Joan. Maurer (who started as a comic book artist in the 50's--illustrating Stooge comics with Shemp in them!), became a Hollywood producer/director who ended up owning all the rights to the Stooges, once they made their big TV comeback. He's the guy who put together their 60's feature films ("Have Rocket Will Travel," etc) and, in order to cash in even more on the Stooges while they were still active, started that inane cartoon series, which each included a live skit with Moe, Larry and "Curly Joe" DeRita.
And yes, that silly theme song does stick in the brain..

Edited by - HassoBenSoba on 06/26/2010 15:41:48
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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 06/27/2010 :  07:46:11  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
H.B.S.-I've never understood why all women I've met and known hate the Stooges. My wife will not watch them and doesn't even want to be around when they're on. I wonder if women in theaters acted the same way back in the 30's and 40's.
When the stooges got their star on the Hollywood walk of fame, I met Emil Sitka. He was a real gentleman and we had a really good conversation. I should add that he was in a lot of the later shorts. At one point I knew a guy who was transferring their old home movies to vhs. The color footage I saw had been taken at a house party in the 40's. The boys are looking and acting normal and there appear to be servents in attendance. I believe it was taken at Moe's house and they seem to be living like movie stars.
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HassoBenSoba

USA
642 Posts

Posted - 06/27/2010 :  22:30:06  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Jim--

That's great--you met Emil "Hold hands, you lovebirds!" Sitka. What an honor. Any pictures taken? What did you discuss with him? Did you meet Joe Besser that day?

Emil seemed to be a real "Region"-kind of guy; I don't know if he was
Serbian, Croatian, or what...he was raised in a Catholic convent in Pittsburgh. I dont' think he ever got "carried away" with the film business, because he always held down a regular 9-to-5 job, even all the time he was working in films. A truly talented and funny man, who did ALL of his own stunt work, too!

Here's a photo of a (late) friend of mine--John Ewaniuk, a real Stooge expert from Philly; this photo was taken in April of 1978 when he visited Hollywood and met and interviewed Emil.

Emil Sitka (L), John Ewaniuk (R)

Edited by - HassoBenSoba on 06/27/2010 22:31:04
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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 06/28/2010 :  08:15:40  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I had just paid my projectionist union dues on Sunset and when I left the building I noticed a crowd on Vine st. so I went over and it was the tail end of the stooges getting their star on the Walk Of Fame ceremony. Besser must have been surrounded but Emil was easy to get to and I had seen him a week or two earlier at a film convention. This was in the days before cell phones so I didn't get a picture but he was truly one of the nice guys!
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emttt

USA
19 Posts

Posted - 07/05/2010 :  20:37:59  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If any of you get to the Chicago area there is a guy "Rich Koz" who has a how called "Stoog-a-palooza" that shows the old shorts. It used to be on WCIU 26, but now I believe it is on ME TV an affiliate of WCIU. He also is "Svengoolie" a horror movie host. He is a treasure, and one of the last of a dying breed of local hosts producing local shows. Unfortunately my grandkids will never know the joy of local programming; except the news.

LONG LIVE LOCAL HOSTS & LONG LIVE THE STOOGES!!!
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HassoBenSoba

USA
642 Posts

Posted - 07/06/2010 :  01:50:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
In the fall of 2004, I was a guest on Rich Koz's "Stoogeapalooza" TV show. I am the proud owner of five ORIGINAL (not copies) Stooge scripts from the mid-1940's (all later Curly films), which Rich and I discussed and showed on camera during our interview. It was a lot of fun--he's a good guy and a true Stooge fan.

Here's the link to the TV interview (on You Tube):

http://youtu.be/PACwbHh0LGI


Larry r

Edited by - HassoBenSoba on 07/26/2011 02:18:01
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Jay

145 Posts

Posted - 08/23/2010 :  18:26:17  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I see that no one has tried to answer HassoBenSoba's question #1 and #3. The answer for Question #1 is it was Ray Rayner who played the character Andy Starr.

As for Question #3, I had no luck searching for the answer.

I would like to post a trivia question.
During the over 200 short films the Three Stooges performed in for Columbia pictures, in only one of them did FOUR stooges appear in the same short film. What was the name of this short film?

HINT: The four stooges who appeared in that short film were Moe, Larry, Shemp and Curly.

Finally, I have a question that I need answered. I always thought the correct spelling for the youngest Stooge was Curly until I saw the movie slate that I posted in another message in this thread where it appears as "Curley". Does anyone know the correct spelling?


Edited by - Jay on 08/23/2010 18:45:53
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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 08/24/2010 :  08:49:14  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Coo Coo in The Choo Choo would be the answer to your question
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Jay

145 Posts

Posted - 08/25/2010 :  20:33:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jim Plummer

Coo Coo in The Choo Choo would be the answer to your question



Sorry but Cuckoo on the Choo Choo is incorrect.
You can view part 1 at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q0XxnbmJQS0 and part 2 at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85YUZ1qfzwI&NR=1.

Curly does not appear in the film nor in the credits. Also, since Curly passed away in early 1952 and this film was released in late 1952, I suspect it was filmed after Curly's death. So Curly could not be in this film along with Moe, Larry and Shemp.

Please try again.

Edited by - Jay on 08/25/2010 20:39:22
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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 09/24/2010 :  23:05:52  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Anybody notice that Grace Bradley Boyd, The widow of William Boyd Hopalong Cassidy died on her 97th birthday 9-21? I met her about three years ago and she had some good Hoppy stories.
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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 09/24/2010 :  23:09:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
So what is the answer. I think it's a short with Curley as one of the passengers in the railroad coach.
quote:
Originally posted by Jay

I see that no one has tried to answer HassoBenSoba's question #1 and #3. The answer for Question #1 is it was Ray Rayner who played the character Andy Starr.

As for Question #3, I had no luck searching for the answer.

I would like to post a trivia question.
During the over 200 short films the Three Stooges performed in for Columbia pictures, in only one of them did FOUR stooges appear in the same short film. What was the name of this short film?

HINT: The four stooges who appeared in that short film were Moe, Larry, Shemp and Curly.

Finally, I have a question that I need answered. I always thought the correct spelling for the youngest Stooge was Curly until I saw the movie slate that I posted in another message in this thread where it appears as "Curley". Does anyone know the correct spelling?



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LegulusQ

USA
56 Posts

Posted - 09/25/2010 :  01:25:02  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The name of the short with all four of the Stooges was "Hold That Lion", from 1947, where Curly had a cameo as a passenger on the train 'Cannonball Express".

Craig

LegulusQ
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LegulusQ

USA
56 Posts

Posted - 09/25/2010 :  01:34:49  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Larry, could the answer to your question 3 be "Some More of Samoa", which featured the island of Rhum Boogie?

LegulusQ
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HassoBenSoba

USA
642 Posts

Posted - 09/28/2010 :  01:39:25  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
MOE---STOP THE PRESSES!

Here's the answers to my ill-fated trivia quiz from June 25th.

1.) It's no secret that old codger Andy Starr, proprietor of the Odeon Theater, was played by Bob Bell, the same guy who portrayed BOZO on WGN during the 60's into the 80's. Bell, a master of disguise and voice, was also a totally "straight" newscaster on WGN Radio and TV, who doubled as the kiddie TV characters as needed.

2.) Yes, the very first Stooges host on WGN (fall of '58) was indeed WGN news staffer Carl Greyson, and his "non-human co-host" was a
chimp who was called "Chatter". Pretty lame stuff...little comedy routines, etc between man 'n monkey as a filler during the half-hour show.

3.) The very first stooge short ever broadcast in Chicago (on Monday, Oct 6, 1958) was the 1947 Shemp film "All Gummed Up" -- Stooges as drug store operators who invent a "Fountain of Youth" serum that turns old Mrs. Flint into the gorgeous Christine McIntyre. They end up eating a cake she bakes, draped with wads of chewing gum instead of the marshmallows called for by the recipe ("Do marshmallows have pits? No, they're empty like yer' skull!")

My brother MIke and I remember seeing this film on that day, and my checking the Hammond Times microfilm listings in the library recently confirmed the memory.

LR

3.)
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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 10/03/2010 :  08:54:27  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Didn't Chatter create problems on air?
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Jay

145 Posts

Posted - 10/04/2010 :  00:39:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by LegulusQ

The name of the short with all four of the Stooges was "Hold That Lion", from 1947, where Curly had a cameo as a passenger on the train 'Cannonball Express".

Craig

LegulusQ



You are absolutely correct!
It was HOLD THAT LION where four stooges appeared. You can watch the Curly cameo scene at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPFuMKgTvN8.
Curly is sitting in one of the train passenger seats pretending to be asleep. A black derby hat covers his face until Larry removes it. Then after Moe removes the clothes pin from Curly's nose, Curly begins to make a couple of his familiar sound effects.
Since this was filmed after Curly had the major stroke that caused him to leave the Stooges, he let his hair grow back, and it appears black in this scene.

Edited by - Jay on 10/04/2010 00:44:37
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HassoBenSoba

USA
642 Posts

Posted - 07/30/2011 :  21:50:07  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey, guys....

Just dug out a few more pics.

There was a very fine director at Columbia Studios named Ed Bernds; (he was from Chicago--worked at WCFL in the late '20's). Ed directed the best of the Shemp films and some of the very last ones with Curly when he was very ill.

Here's a picture of Ed (in the middle) on the set of a short comedy with Shemp and big ol' Tom Kennedy, who also had a long career in films.



And here's Ed Bernds in Hollywood in September, 1988 with my lovely wife Celeste.



We had just enjoyed lunch and much reminiscing with Mr. Bernds, who was a great guy and very generous with his time. In fact, it was at this lunch that he told us that---to that very day---he was still receiving a royalty check for $72 every year for having written the lyrics to

"Oh, Elaine, Elaine,
Come out.
Time is short,
The guards are hanging about."


which the troubador Stooges sing at night in the courtyard in the 1948 film "Squareheads of the Round Table", which Ed directed.

LR
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Tom J

1185 Posts

Posted - 07/31/2011 :  08:19:15  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Cool, cool, cool! Thanks for sharing, Larry!
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Jay

145 Posts

Posted - 12/24/2011 :  20:56:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
HassoBenSoba, today, I watched the Malice in the Palace episode over at YouTube. The actor Vernon Dent played your namesake.
In one scene, he is sitting at a table in a restaurant. However, when a message attached to a dagger is thrown at his table and he reads it, it spelled your namesake as "Hassan Ben Sober". Why did you adopt a differently spelled version?

To see what I saw, click on the link below and cue it up to 09:50.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=labL_KAD2rk


Edited by - Jay on 12/24/2011 21:03:40
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HassoBenSoba

USA
642 Posts

Posted - 12/26/2011 :  15:48:48  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
JAY--

I blew it, plain and simple.

I started using "HassoBenSoba" without checking "Malice in the Palace" (I totally forgot that the the name was actually spelled out in the film). When Vernon Dent proclaims his name earlier in the scene, he definitely says "SOBA" (instead of "SOBER"), so I just spelled it that way as my username. Shortly after my first Sheptalk post, my brother Mike mentioned the mistake to me; at that point, though, I had already used the technically-incorrect version too many times, so I just decided to leave it (and take the abuse from true Stooge purists).

Larry
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 12/28/2011 :  22:52:08  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
OK, he wasn't human, but still he brought a lot of pleasure to millions with his comedic gifts:

http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2011/12/28/chimp-who-played-cheetah-in-tarzan-movies-dies-at-age-80/ :

'A Florida animal sanctuary says Cheetah the chimpanzee sidekick in the Tarzan movies of the early 1930s has died at age 80.

'The Suncoast Primate Sanctuary in Palm Harbor announced that Cheetah died Dec. 24 of kidney failure.

'Sanctuary outreach director Debbie Cobb on Wednesday told The Tampa Tribune newspaper that Cheetah was outgoing, loved finger painting and liked to see people laugh. She says he seemed to be tuned into human feelings.

' ...Cobb says Cheetah came to the sanctuary from Weissmuller's estate sometime around 1960.

'Cobb says Cheetah wasn't a troublemaker. Still, sanctuary volunteer Ron Priest says that when the chimp didn't like what was going on, he would throw feces.'


In the 50s I used to watch Tarzan movies on TV just to see Cheetah, not Jane. Then puberty struck, and that all changed ...

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63
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Jim Plummer

USA
317 Posts

Posted - 01/01/2012 :  08:22:10  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Anybody know how long chimps are supposed to live. I don't know but 80 seems kind of old. I've heard that the little fellows can get mean after they get past two years of age.
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Tom J

1185 Posts

Posted - 01/01/2012 :  08:42:33  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I read somewhere an article about Cheetah's passing that stated that most chimps live 35 to 45 years in captivity, so his longevity was exceptional.

Tomster
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duane

370 Posts

Posted - 01/01/2012 :  12:31:36  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Tom J

I read somewhere an article about Cheetah's passing that stated that most chimps live 35 to 45 years in captivity, so his longevity was exceptional.
Tomster


Perhaps Johnnie Weismueller taught Cheetah how to exercise and therefore he kept himself in shape!
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Tom J

1185 Posts

Posted - 01/01/2012 :  12:55:35  Show Profile  Visit Tom J's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by duane

quote:
Originally posted by Tom J

I read somewhere an article about Cheetah's passing that stated that most chimps live 35 to 45 years in captivity, so his longevity was exceptional.
Tomster


Perhaps Johnnie Weismueller taught Cheetah how to exercise and therefore he kept himself in shape!



You might be onto something, Duane! :)

Happy New Year!
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HassoBenSoba

USA
642 Posts

Posted - 01/01/2012 :  19:56:22  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
How about the chimp with a connection to da' Region.....
Michael Jackson's pal BUBBLES, who(m) I understand has retired to Florida.

Now there's one messed-up monkey.

LR
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duane

370 Posts

Posted - 01/01/2012 :  22:47:23  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Actually, I feel sorry for Bubbles!
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Bill Bucko

USA
359 Posts

Posted - 01/02/2012 :  02:02:16  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jim Plummer

Anybody know how long chimps are supposed to live. I don't know but 80 seems kind of old. I've heard that the little fellows can get mean after they get past two years of age.



There was a follow-up article stating the story might be a hoax:

http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2011/12/29/was-reported-death-chimp-who-played-tarzans-friend-cheetah-hoax/

since 80 years seems too long for a chimp's life-span. Some are saying the role of Cheetah was filled by several chimps. The animal shelter was quoted as saying the original records were destroyed in a fire, but someone there remembers the chimp being there for several decades.

If I DID fall for a phony story, maybe I can say as PeeWee Herman did after falling off his bike: "I meant to do that." :-)

Bill



Warren G. Harding Class of '63
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