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Downtown Hammond of the 1960's

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Topic:


Topic author: Tom J
Subject: Downtown Hammond of the 1960's
Posted on: 11/27/2006 23:09:49
Message:

I hope others will contribute to this thread with their own memories of Downtown, but I will start things off with this little essay that I wrote about it. My memories of Downtown are from the decade of the 60's, especially from my high school years, 1963-1967.

Please, if you have fond memories of Downtown, share them here.

Tom

Downtown Hammond of the 1960's



Downtown Hammond was a vibrant, happy place with an excellent variety of stores. Customers and store clerks engaged in friendly conversations as items were purchased. People were not in a hurry, because they were enjoying the shopping experience. There was a spirit of optimism among the people who worked and shopped downtown; going downtown was an uplifting experience.

Downtown was big enough, and downtown was small enough. It was big enough to have a fine array of stores and many things to do, but it was small enough that one could feel comfortable there. Downtown was clean, and downtown was safe. It was a place that all were proud of.

Without question, the very heart of downtown Hammond was the intersection of Hohman Avenue and Sibley Street. On the northwest corner of this intersection was Walgreen’s, with Nagdeman’s women’s clothing store and the Parthenon Theatre on the north side of it. On the southwest corner and running the entire length of the west side of the 5200 block of Hohman was the Goldblatt’s store. Across the street from Goldblatt’s were FW Woolworth, Schiff Shoes, Rothschild’s, and Jack Fox and Sons. The northeast corner of Hohman and Sibley was home to the Penny’s store.

The 400 block of State Street, the home of Minas’s, was probably equally as prestigious as the 5200 block of Hohman. Minas’s was the flagship establishment of that block, but there were other large stores as well.

There were two theatres downtown, the Paramount and the Parthenon. Walgreen’s and Woolworth’s had lunch counters that served burgers, fries and fountain drinks. Downtown was much more than just a place to shop: it was a place where friends met to have lunch, or to take in a movie, or to just “hang out.”

It was a pleasant place to just walk around and “window shop,” especially during the Christmas season, when all the city streets were adorned with decorations, and the store windows were alive with displays depicting scenes of the season. Some displays at Goldblatt’s were even animated. It was so easy to feel the Christmas spirit when one walked around downtown Hammond, taking in all the decorations and displays with one’s breath steaming and with one’s cheeks turned a rosy red from the crisp winter air. The sounds of Christmas music and the ringing of the Salvation Army Santa Claus’s bell filled the air, and one was surrounded by happy, smiling people doing their Christmas shopping.

Downtown was a place where the teenagers cruised slowly in their cars with their windows rolled down on summer nights. The girls walking along the sidewalks would pretend to be offended when the boys in the passing cars whistled and whooped at them.

During business hours, scores of people walked the busy sidewalks. There was something downtown for everyone, and one could see people of all ages stepping smartly along the sidewalks in front of the stores. The people walking through the downtown area were happy people.

The stores stayed open until 9:00 PM on Mondays, Thursdays, and Fridays. They closed at 5:00 PM the other nights, and, of course, the stores were closed on Sundays. The Parthenon Theatre kept different hours than did the stores, as one would expect, and showed a late movie beginning at 9:00 PM each night.

The downtown stores were wonderlands, with aisle after aisle of merchandise attractively displayed. Friendly and knowledgeable clerks helped the customers with their selections. The toy departments were fantasylands and were almost too much for a little boy to handle.

Shopping was a personal thing back in the fifties and the sixties, the glory days of Downtown that I recall.

As a person walked through the revolving door at Minas’s, he or she would be greeted with a friendly, genuine smile from the nearest Minas employee. In the summertime, passing through that revolving door would be like going through the Pearly Gates. One experienced immediate relief from the sweltering heat of the street, and in the soothing, cool air of the store was a heavenly scent that defied description. What was the source of those wonderful scents that wafted through the ancient department stores in those days?

The Minas store had an elevator with an operator to get customers to the floor of their choice. The operator wore white gloves and always had a warm smile for her passengers. She would always be polite and professional in her demeanor. One always felt appreciated as a customer at the Edward C. Minas Store.

Minas’s carried quality merchandise and offered it at a fair price. One could find items cheaper at other stores, but he would be compromising on quality by buying them instead of the Minas merchandise.

Whereas today we seem to shun personal contact when we buy things, even to the point of shopping on the Internet, back in the days when downtown Hammond flourished, people enjoyed the experience of interacting with the store clerks, the elevator operators, and even the parking lot attendants.

Yes, even parking one’s car would often involve human contact, depending on where one parked. Most places charged a reasonable fee for parking and had parking lot attendants to take in the money. Many people knew my dad because of his work as the superintendent of the parking garage and of the outdoor parking lot for the Edward C. Minas Company. Dad took his turns in the booths at the garage, and he met thousands of people as he collected their parking fees. Like the other Minas employees, Dad had a smile for the customer and always had time to chat a little. Customers were made to feel very special at Minas’s: they were truly appreciated by all of the store’s employees.

Today we are only interested in buying things quickly, easily, and at the lowest possible price. We live in a Wal-Mart world. No wonder downtown Hammond died.

My trip downtown on July 20, 2005, was one of the saddest experiences in my fifty-six years of life. The mighty and noble Goldblatt’s building is gone. The Walgreen’s building, Nagdeman’s, and the Parthenon Theatre next to it are gone. The cherished Minas store is gone. The buildings that remain are only partially occupied, with many of the windows covered over. It seemed that at any moment I would begin to hear the whistling of the wind and the banging of shutters, while tumbleweeds scurried down the empty streets, as in the movie scenes of old western ghost towns. There is no more retailing in downtown Hammond. There are no more customers, no more clerks, and only an occasional pedestrian walking the once bustling streets.

None of us ever dreamed that downtown Hammond would become the desolate, forlorn place that it is now. We loved our downtown, and we thought there would be no end to its glory.

Some say that the traffic congestion due to the many railroad crossings and heavy train traffic is what killed downtown Hammond. People were tired of being caught by slow moving trains, they reason. Others say that the decline in the steel industry and the subsequent layoffs spelled the death of downtown Hammond. The opening of shopping malls in the outlying areas drew the customers away from downtown. Whatever their reasons, the shoppers preferred to shop in those malls rather than to go downtown, and so, downtown Hammond died.

I hope that this brief story about my beloved downtown Hammond will make people realize what a wonderful place it was. Maybe in some way it will help us to hold dearly to things that we cherish and not be so quick to leave them behind. Our society is becoming more and more impersonal. The human interaction that was so much a part of life in downtown Hammond is all too rare these days.


Hammond High Class of 1967

Replies:


Reply author: Bill Bucko
Replied on: 11/28/2006 05:20:12
Message:

Welcome. And thanks for your essay--it's extremely well written!

We Hessvillites got off at the busstop at the NE corner of Woolworth's, just down the block from Goldblatt's.

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 11/28/2006 06:55:19
Message:

Bill:

Thanks for your kind words.

I remember Woolworths very well. I can still remember those wooden floors that creaked as you walked on them.

Come on, Peeps, chip in with some Downtown memories.

Tom

Hammond High Class of 1967


Reply author: wvcogs
Replied on: 11/28/2006 10:00:40
Message:

Welcome Tom. I agree with Bill. That's a wonderful story about downtown. Like him, I got off the bus in downtown Hammond at Woolworth's. You certainly renewed a lot of memories. Do you remember that almost every year after a big snow storm there was a photo in the Hammond Times of the large pile of snow in the Minas parking lot?

The lady who has been my wife for over 43 years had her first job at Woolworth's during the summer of 1958 before her senior year at Morton High School.

A current young resident of Hammond scanned and posted to Webshots.com some photos of what Hammond look like back in those days. Take a look at them here: http://travel.webshots.com/album/548758428XPERcw .

Not only is downtown closed down now, but also the first shopping center in Hammond, the Woodmar Mall that was opened in 1954, was demolished this past summer. This same person also has photos of what we called Woodmar Shopping Center back in the 1950s and '60s posted on Webshots.

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 11/28/2006 12:07:57
Message:

Ken:

Thank you for your post! I looked at the Downtown pics that you linked me to, and some of them were new to me. I have sure been wishing for some good shots of Hohman Ave. and for some of State Street to help me remember which stores were next to which others. I knew where the major stores were, of course, but I had forgotten where some of the smaller stores were located. A couple of those pictures were just what I have been hoping to find. THANK YOU!

I'll check out the Woodmar pics at home tonight. I'm at work now.

I don't remember the pictures of the snow pile in Minas's parking lot, but I would love to see a copy, if you know where I could find one. That pile would have been created by my dad after normal snowstorms; he operated the Minas Jeep with the snow plow. Dad was in charge of the parking facilities at Minas's, both the outdoor lot and the parking garage as well. Most likely, some much bigger machine was involved in clearing the parking lot after that huge blizzard in 1967.

Ken, I really appreciate your comments. Thanks again.

Tom




Hammond High Class of 1967


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 11/28/2006 14:09:57
Message:

Did any of you folks know Earl Ward, who lived on Kansas in Hessville? Earl passed away a few years ago.

Earl was my dad's best friend, and he worked part time at Minas's in the parking garage for Dad. He also helped Dad stripe parking lots. Dad had his own business, Tru-Line Striping, and painted parking lots to supplement his Minas income.

Earl had a career at Standard Oil as a chemist in the lab, and he helped Dad more out of friendship than for the little bit of extra income.

Dad and Earl were "fishing buddies" as well as business associates. They loved to go to Kentucky Lake in the spring for the crappie spawn.

Earl had a son named Don who went to Morton.

Tom



Hammond High Class of 1967


Reply author: wvcogs
Replied on: 11/29/2006 12:40:03
Message:

Here is the link to Webshot photos of the empty Woodmar (Shopping Center) Mall and after it was demolished last summer:
http://travel.webshots.com/album/548762125dYMZvb .

Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960


Reply author: svea3
Replied on: 12/01/2006 13:56:09
Message:

Ah Goldblatts! Now that was a store! It had its cheap cookie and candy department at the south entrance. I personally liked the yard goods department where I scanned the materials to create clothing just as it was portrayed in the magazines. All my clothes were hand made, even my duds to go on the DC trip by RR train. I took my dancing lessons there in downtown Hammond and then there was my three days of teaching the dance.If anyone has seen Jeff Goldblatt on Fox TV News? Well, he was doing a report from right across the river from me one morning. I jumped into my car and tracked him down amongst the boats in Humbug Marine in Gilbraltar, MI. He was hadsomely thin- even better looking than he is on TV. I asked if he was related to the Goldblatt Department store in Hammond. "NO. I can only wish. Do you think I would be doing this , if I was?"

Does anyone remember painting the windows at the Carson Pierre Scott for Halloween as an ART class project? ala Mr Wauro????

My background Mom - HHS '29 Dad - HTHS '25 Brother '52 HHS Grandmother Hessville Elementary [the one rebuilt in Kennedy Park] My Grandmother was a Lohse, 5th child of Bernhardt. It was her Grandfather FAH Lohse who started the Masonic Lodge in downtown Hammond and gave the property for Caldwell School.



Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 12/01/2006 15:39:55
Message:

Linda:

Thanks for the post. I always enjoy reading the recollections of others who, like me, loved our fantastic Downtown.

Anyone else have some memories to share?

Tom

Hammond High Class of 1967


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 12/01/2006 23:00:20
Message:

For some reason, the program is not allowing me to edit the original post in this thread. I wanted to update the list of stores that were on the opposite side of Hohman from Goldblatts. I left out Kay Jewelers and Lanes. As can be seen from the photo below, the stores from North to South were Woolworths, Schiff Shoes, Kay Jewelers, Lanes, Rothschilds, and Jack Fox and Sons.

Tom
Hammond High Class of 1967


Reply author: wvcogs
Replied on: 12/02/2006 09:54:09
Message:

Take a look at the satellite image of downtown Hammond on Google Maps. Those five buildings on Hohman Avenue between Sibley and Fayette streets are still there.

Here is an image of that favorite Woolworth store that was on the corner of Hohman and Sibley. How about that early 1960s Chevy (?) turning the corner onto Sibley? By the way, this photo appears elsewhere on the Flicklives.com site.



Ken...
Former Hessvillite
Morton Graduate 1960


Reply author: svea3
Replied on: 12/02/2006 17:06:28
Message:

The Woolworth Store is where my mother had her first job. She graduated at 16 in 1929 from HHS. She walked there daily and kept her job until my mother's ethics was in sharp contrast to the her female boss got in the way. She wanted my mother to short weight the cookies and candy and my mother wouldn't do that. She then worked at an architectural firm until whe married my father.

I think that the most important difference from then to now is the ease of transportation which we have now. I used to go on the South Shore every weekend to be in downtown Chicago.


Reply author: DEEDEE
Replied on: 12/30/2006 00:24:05
Message:

Love the pictures of Downtown. I spent so much time there. After we moved to Hessville from Hammond (Indiana St.) I would take the bus to hammond Tech. After school, I would walk to town and hang out. I worked at Red Robbin my senior year. It was on Hohman North of Walgreens. I can't remember how many times I caught the bus at Woolworths to go back home.

When I was 12-14, on Sunday's, my friend and I rode the bus from Hessville to Hammond to attend Hyles Anderson First Baptist Church. Being sneaky little gals, we hopped off the bus and headed to Walgreens to have a coke or snack then to Goldblatts and Woolworths. We made it back to the bus in time for the ride home. We were lucky our parents never asked how church was. I remember my parents shopping at Millikans often. Wasn't it a sporing goods store?
Was the Times Newspaper Building on Fayette St? And was The Army/Navy Surplus at the opposite corner (Hohman & Sibley) from Walgreens?
St. Margarets Hospital is completely different from the 60's as I remember. my first two children were born in St.Margarets Hospital as was I. Diane

From Hammond & Hessville
Now..."the Boonies"


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 12/30/2006 07:11:51
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by DEEDEE

Love the pictures of Downtown. I spent so much time there. After we moved to Hessville from Hammond (Indiana St.) I would take the bus to hammond Tech. After school, I would walk to town and hang out. I worked at Red Robbin my senior year. It was on Hohman North of Walgreens. I can't remember how many times I caught the bus at Woolworths to go back home.

When I was 12-14, on Sunday's, my friend and I rode the bus from Hessville to Hammond to attend Hyles Anderson First Baptist Church. Being sneaky little gals, we hopped off the bus and headed to Walgreens to have a coke or snack then to Goldblatts and Woolworths. We made it back to the bus in time for the ride home. We were lucky our parents never asked how church was. I remember my parents shopping at Millikans often. Wasn't it a sporing goods store?
Was the Times Newspaper Building on Fayette St? And was The Army/Navy Surplus at the opposite corner (Hohman & Sibley) from Walgreens?
St. Margarets Hospital is completely different from the 60's as I remember. my first two children were born in St.Margarets Hospital as was I. Diane

From Hammond & Hessville
Now..."the Boonies"



Here's the Times office, and, yes, it was on Fayette. I was a Hammond Times paper boy for a year or two, and I had to go to this office to pay my bill each week.




Here's an aerial shot of Downtown Hammond.



I'm pretty sure that building number 21 would have been the Times office.

Some of the other notable builings were:

#3 FBC (where a certain naughty girl was SUPPOSED to attend... I also went to that church, but Mom and Dad took me, so I HAD to actually attend the services. I'm very glad that my parents took me to church every Sunday as I was growing up. By the way, you could not have hung out in stores on Sundays back in my days, since all the downtown stores were closed on Sundays back then.)
#8 Minas's
#10 Millikan's
#18 Woolworth's
#19 Goldblatt's
#13 Walgreen's
#12 Parthenon
#14 J.C. Penney
#20 Jack Fox and Sons
#23 Calumet National Bank
#17 Meuller's Hardware, which is STILL operating! I think it is the ONLY retail establishment left Downtown.

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!




Reply author: Bill Bucko
Replied on: 12/30/2006 21:35:36
Message:

Thanks, I never saw that photo before!

# 11 Indiana Hotel (with the SEEDY reputation!)
# 24 old courthouse from the 1800s, with its great stone tower (that I almost never saw, because Goldblatt's was in the way)(haunting, mysterious to a young kid)

What else can you identify? Are the hospital and the Paramount in the photo, or were they just a little further south (left of picture)?

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 12/30/2006 21:48:53
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Bill Bucko

Thanks, I never saw that photo before!

# 11 Indiana Hotel (with the SEEDY reputation!)
# 24 old courthouse from the 1800s, with its great stone tower (that I almost never saw, because Goldblatt's was in the way)(haunting, mysterious to a young kid)

What else can you identify? Are the hospital and the Paramount in the photo, or were they just a little further south (left of picture)?

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63



Bill:

Yes, you can just barely see St. Margaret's in that picture. That big building that you can only see part of in the extreme upper left of the picture is St. Margaret's. Heck, that's where I was born, and that picture was taken the year I was born.

Wait! Look in that window on the top floor, fifth room from the left! That's ME waving at the photographer's airplane!

I think the Paramount is the building that is only partially visible at the very lefthand edge of the picture and is even with St. Margarets, but on the east side of Hohman.

Tom



A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!


Reply author: Pro2am
Replied on: 04/08/2007 17:49:30
Message:


Great essay, Tom - and very accurate! I spent a lot of time in downtown Hammond in the mid-late '60s, and everything was pretty much the wasy you describe it. A busy but friendly environment where you could go to shop, hang out, or whatever (Petula Clark's song "Downtown" gives a good feel for the general atmosophere of the area).

As far as that Christmastime magic that the downtown area exuded, for me this was prominent during an earlier phase of my life - the mid-late 1950s. We used to do considerable Christmas shopping there during these years, and as kids tend to be much more enchanted by the holiday atmosphere than teenagers or adults, the timing was perfect. Then, as more of the newer stores like Shopper's World, Topps, etc. began to appear, our shopping habits changed; thus by the early 1960s we didn't frequent downtown Hammond much anymore.

My personal opinion is that the horrible train traffic and the newer shopping stores were the two main things that killed downtown Hammond.

You described your 2005 visit to the area, and I have to agree 100%. It's a very sad experience. So much that was such a major part of our lives is gone. What a shame. Since I live in Hammond and have for most of my life I was witness to the slow death of the downtown area. By the mid 1970s I didn't even want to go near the place; it was getting that bad.

Personally, I think that the last store I shopped at was Barrelli's Furniture store on State St. This was in December of 1994. Since then I rarely go near the area expect when passing through on my way to some other destination. The Hammond Fist Baptist Church now owns a lot of the property in the northeast section of the downtown area. What is irritating is that it's almost impossible to drive through there on Sundays because of the congestion.

But at least SOME of the old stuff is still standing, and a few of the businesses are still there - though mostly those located further south on Hohman Ave. (for example, I think that Dave's Camera Mart is still there).

Yes, a lot has changed over the past 40 years. As the Judds once lamented, "They call it progress, but I don't know...".

Again, thanks for a great ode to downtown Hammond! :)

Mike Rapchak Jr.
Hammond

-----------------------------------

quote:
Originally posted by Tom J

I hope others will contribute to this thread with their own memories of Downtown, but I will start things off with this little essay that I wrote about it. My memories of Downtown are from the decade of the 60's, especially from my high school years, 1963-1967.

Please, if you have fond memories of Downtown, share them here.

Tom

Downtown Hammond of the 1960's



Downtown Hammond was a vibrant, happy place with an excellent variety of stores. Customers and store clerks engaged in friendly conversations as items were purchased. People were not in a hurry, because they were enjoying the shopping experience. There was a spirit of optimism among the people who worked and shopped downtown; going downtown was an uplifting experience.

Downtown was big enough, and downtown was small enough. It was big enough to have a fine array of stores and many things to do, but it was small enough that one could feel comfortable there. Downtown was clean, and downtown was safe. It was a place that all were proud of.

Without question, the very heart of downtown Hammond was the intersection of Hohman Avenue and Sibley Street. On the northwest corner of this intersection was Walgreen’s, with Nagdeman’s women’s clothing store and the Parthenon Theatre on the north side of it. On the southwest corner and running the entire length of the west side of the 5200 block of Hohman was the Goldblatt’s store. Across the street from Goldblatt’s were FW Woolworth, Schiff Shoes, Rothschild’s, and Jack Fox and Sons. The northeast corner of Hohman and Sibley was home to the Penny’s store.

The 400 block of State Street, the home of Minas’s, was probably equally as prestigious as the 5200 block of Hohman. Minas’s was the flagship establishment of that block, but there were other large stores as well.

There were two theatres downtown, the Paramount and the Parthenon. Walgreen’s and Woolworth’s had lunch counters that served burgers, fries and fountain drinks. Downtown was much more than just a place to shop: it was a place where friends met to have lunch, or to take in a movie, or to just “hang out.”

It was a pleasant place to just walk around and “window shop,” especially during the Christmas season, when all the city streets were adorned with decorations, and the store windows were alive with displays depicting scenes of the season. Some displays at Goldblatt’s were even animated. It was so easy to feel the Christmas spirit when one walked around downtown Hammond, taking in all the decorations and displays with one’s breath steaming and with one’s cheeks turned a rosy red from the crisp winter air. The sounds of Christmas music and the ringing of the Salvation Army Santa Claus’s bell filled the air, and one was surrounded by happy, smiling people doing their Christmas shopping.

Downtown was a place where the teenagers cruised slowly in their cars with their windows rolled down on summer nights. The girls walking along the sidewalks would pretend to be offended when the boys in the passing cars whistled and whooped at them.

During business hours, scores of people walked the busy sidewalks. There was something downtown for everyone, and one could see people of all ages stepping smartly along the sidewalks in front of the stores. The people walking through the downtown area were happy people.

The stores stayed open until 9:00 PM on Mondays, Thursdays, and Fridays. They closed at 5:00 PM the other nights, and, of course, the stores were closed on Sundays. The Parthenon Theatre kept different hours than did the stores, as one would expect, and showed a late movie beginning at 9:00 PM each night.

The downtown stores were wonderlands, with aisle after aisle of merchandise attractively displayed. Friendly and knowledgeable clerks helped the customers with their selections. The toy departments were fantasylands and were almost too much for a little boy to handle.

Shopping was a personal thing back in the fifties and the sixties, the glory days of Downtown that I recall.

As a person walked through the revolving door at Minas’s, he or she would be greeted with a friendly, genuine smile from the nearest Minas employee. In the summertime, passing through that revolving door would be like going through the Pearly Gates. One experienced immediate relief from the sweltering heat of the street, and in the soothing, cool air of the store was a heavenly scent that defied description. What was the source of those wonderful scents that wafted through the ancient department stores in those days?

The Minas store had an elevator with an operator to get customers to the floor of their choice. The operator wore white gloves and always had a warm smile for her passengers. She would always be polite and professional in her demeanor. One always felt appreciated as a customer at the Edward C. Minas Store.

Minas’s carried quality merchandise and offered it at a fair price. One could find items cheaper at other stores, but he would be compromising on quality by buying them instead of the Minas merchandise.

Whereas today we seem to shun personal contact when we buy things, even to the point of shopping on the Internet, back in the days when downtown Hammond flourished, people enjoyed the experience of interacting with the store clerks, the elevator operators, and even the parking lot attendants.

Yes, even parking one’s car would often involve human contact, depending on where one parked. Most places charged a reasonable fee for parking and had parking lot attendants to take in the money. Many people knew my dad because of his work as the superintendent of the parking garage and of the outdoor parking lot for the Edward C. Minas Company. Dad took his turns in the booths at the garage, and he met thousands of people as he collected their parking fees. Like the other Minas employees, Dad had a smile for the customer and always had time to chat a little. Customers were made to feel very special at Minas’s: they were truly appreciated by all of the store’s employees.

Today we are only interested in buying things quickly, easily, and at the lowest possible price. We live in a Wal-Mart world. No wonder downtown Hammond died.

My trip downtown on July 20, 2005, was one of the saddest experiences in my fifty-six years of life. The mighty and noble Goldblatt’s building is gone. The Walgreen’s building, Nagdeman’s, and the Parthenon Theatre next to it are gone. The cherished Minas store is gone. The buildings that remain are only partially occupied, with many of the windows covered over. It seemed that at any moment I would begin to hear the whistling of the wind and the banging of shutters, while tumbleweeds scurried down the empty streets, as in the movie scenes of old western ghost towns. There is no more retailing in downtown Hammond. There are no more customers, no more clerks, and only an occasional pedestrian walking the once bustling streets.

None of us ever dreamed that downtown Hammond would become the desolate, forlorn place that it is now. We loved our downtown, and we thought there would be no end to its glory.

Some say that the traffic congestion due to the many railroad crossings and heavy train traffic is what killed downtown Hammond. People were tired of being caught by slow moving trains, they reason. Others say that the decline in the steel industry and the subsequent layoffs spelled the death of downtown Hammond. The opening of shopping malls in the outlying areas drew the customers away from downtown. Whatever their reasons, the shoppers preferred to shop in those malls rather than to go downtown, and so, downtown Hammond died.

I hope that this brief story about my beloved downtown Hammond will make people realize what a wonderful place it was. Maybe in some way it will help us to hold dearly to things that we cherish and not be so quick to leave them behind. Our society is becoming more and more impersonal. The human interaction that was so much a part of life in downtown Hammond is all too rare these days.


Hammond High Class of 1967


Reply author: cool_chick
Replied on: 05/26/2007 23:11:12
Message:

Does anyone remember Armen's Hot Dogs on Calumet and Sibley?


Reply author: svea3
Replied on: 05/27/2007 14:28:29
Message:

#11 Was that the seedy hotel where I studied with Violet Milne 3 to 4 days a week? That is indeed a great photo.


Reply author: svea3
Replied on: 05/27/2007 16:09:12
Message:


WELLLLL I did reply but I know not where it went. I think #11 seedy hotel is where Violet Milne had her studio . Others might be able to confirm this. Violet Milne trained the Dancers of Hammond/Hessville for some 43 years. She and her sister were good enough to be on Broadway. Her mother was the seamstress who sewed alll the costumes, no catalog shopping for recitals. She tsught Russian, French and Italian style ballet. She was such a good trainer that I was a level six Cacchetti when I went to college at MSU.

IT APPEARED!


Reply author: wvcogs
Replied on: 10/17/2007 11:48:59
Message:

Here's a look at the development of State Street in downtown Hammond over the years. The first picture is from an old postcard, probably 1920s, looking east with the Minas store on the right and the Bijou theater on the left. The middle picture looking west is from a Chamber of Commerce 1966 publication and shows a very active State Street. The bottom photo was posted to an album on the Webshots.com online library by ajschicubs85. It shows the present day State Street looking west with the First Baptist Church auditorium on the left where the Minas store was. ajschicubs85 titled this photo "State Street Canyon Today."

Ken...


Reply author: bruceb
Replied on: 04/25/2008 16:07:03
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by svea3


WELLLLL I did reply but I know not where it went. I think #11 seedy hotel is where Violet Milne had her studio . Others might be able to confirm this. Violet Milne trained the Dancers of Hammond/Hessville for some 43 years. She and her sister were good enough to be on Broadway. Her mother was the seamstress who sewed alll the costumes, no catalog shopping for recitals. She tsught Russian, French and Italian style ballet. She was such a good trainer that I was a level six Cacchetti when I went to college at MSU.

IT APPEARED!



I know this is an ancient thread, but I can confirm with certainty that #11 is, in fact, the hotel where Violet Milne had her studio. I know because a very attractive young lady with whom I was very enamoured took lessons there. A few doors down State Street was a garage that repaired sports and imported cars. It was seedy looking place, too, but the mechanic was excellent and my friend Jim and I bought our first MG from him.


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 05/07/2008 20:36:12
Message:

I know I gave this thread the title, "Downtown Hammond of the 1960s," but here is an older photo that is of special interest to me, since my dad managed the parking for Minas's.

This shot shows the outdoor parking lot on the south side of Sibley Street that became the site of the Minas Parking Garage, which opened in February 1961.

The photographer would have been standing in the parking lot immediately behind the Minas store, and he would have had his back to the store as he took this shot.

Can anyone ID that building dead center in the background, with just a little bit of the Calumet Bank building sticking up behind it? It looks like it has spires on it. I'll post a blown up section to show that building better.

Tom







In the first picture, what were those buildings on either side of the parking lot on the south side of Sibley. Wasn't there a pool hall on either the east or the west side of that parking lot? Also, was there a little restaurant of some kind to the east (left in the picture) near the intersection of Sibley and Oakley? Was there also a place that sold hubcaps in that little strip?

EDIT:

The photographer was obsviously standing on some elevated platform when he took the picture, and I wonder if he might have actually been taking the picture from an upper floor window of the Minas Store?

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!


Reply author: seejay2
Replied on: 05/11/2008 10:13:22
Message:

Hey, Tom!
I remember a place on the Blvd, about one block south of the 9 span on the east side of the street that sold your hubcaps back to you. I think it was called "Hubcap City". I wonder how long they had to think about that one?......Cj


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 05/11/2008 19:29:38
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by seejay2

Hey, Tom!
I remember a place on the Blvd, about one block south of the 9 span on the east side of the street that sold your hubcaps back to you. I think it was called "Hubcap City". I wonder how long they had to think about that one?......Cj



I sort of remember that place, too, but only very vaguely. There was a big junk yard on Summer Street just east of Indy Blvd, wasn't there?

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!


Reply author: Bill Bucko
Replied on: 05/12/2008 02:36:48
Message:

Those 2 excellent photos show vividly how crowded downtown Hammond was, with railroad tracks!

Tom, the huge junkyard at Indianapolis and Summer is still there. I've referred to it in my posts a time or two, in connection with the huge prairie between Summer and the IHB freight yard.

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63


Reply author: wvcogs
Replied on: 05/12/2008 18:52:42
Message:

Tom,

Here is the information you wanted about the building in the center of the picture. This came from Richard Lytle at the Hammond Public Library. Mr. Lytle also is an officer of the Hammond Historical Society.

"The large center building is the old Central School building which, before 1923, sat on the spot where the Bank Calumet Building (the one immediately behind it) sits. The old Central School Building was MOVED from that spot, turned 90 degrees or more and put where you see it as the first piece of the old Hammond Tech facility. That old building was torn down in 1950 when the new Hammond Tech facility (now called the Career Center) was finished. The date of the photo would then be between 1923 and 1950."

Ken...


Reply author: seejay2
Replied on: 05/12/2008 20:05:41
Message:

Calumet Auto Parts, Tom! Some of us back then hadjust about cobbled together their entire cars with parts from that place. If it hadn't been for CAP, those junkers would still be sitting on the front lawns with engine blocks hoisted up in trees....CJ


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 05/12/2008 20:12:50
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by wvcogs

Tom,

Here is the information you wanted about the building in the center of the picture. This came from Richard Lytle at the Hammond Public Library. Mr. Lytle also is an officer of the Hammond Historical Society.

"The large center building is the old Central School building which, before 1923, sat on the spot where the Bank Calumet Building (the one immediately behind it) sits. The old Central School Building was MOVED from that spot, turned 90 degrees or more and put where you see it as the first piece of the old Hammond Tech facility. That old building was torn down in 1950 when the new Hammond Tech facility (now called the Career Center) was finished. The date of the photo would then be between 1923 and 1950."

Ken...




Thanks a bunch, Ken! No wonder I didn't remember that building. I was born in June of 1949, and it was torn down in 1950.

I think this picture must have been taken in the very late 1940s, or maybe even in 1950, judging by the cars in the picture. We know it could not have been taken later than 1950, based on the info Richard Lytle provided you.

Speaking of good old Richard, I called him one day last week and signed up as a member of the Hammond Historical Society. He sent me some back issues of the newsletter, and I am supposed to cut out one of the registration forms and send it back with a check for $10.

Thanks again, Ken.

Tom



A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 05/12/2008 20:18:12
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by seejay2

Calumet Auto Parts, Tom! Some of us back then hadjust about cobbled together their entire cars with parts from that place. If it hadn't been for CAP, those junkers would still be sitting on the front lawns with engine blocks hoisted up in trees....CJ



Chris:

Where was Calumet Auto Parts? That sounds SO familiar to me! I can't remember where it was, though. I assume it was on Calumet Avenue somewhere? Must have been way north on Calumet, because I remember most of the bigger places of business on south Calumet.

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!


Reply author: wvcogs
Replied on: 05/12/2008 22:07:15
Message:

Check this site http://www.hammondindiana.com/history/school.htm for a color tinted picture of Central School and a brief history as well as pictures and information about other schools in Hammond.

Ken...


Reply author: seejay2
Replied on: 05/13/2008 14:52:52
Message:

I'm sorry, Tom. I'm screwing up. I'm running two different places together. CAP was in two different locations:
The first one was about 5 blocks north of HHS at 5503 Calumet, then it moved south, in the 70's, to a location 2 or 3 blocks north of the expressway.

The junkyard was "Calumet Auto Wrecking", I.believe. That was located at the south end of the 9-span...Cj


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 05/13/2008 18:35:46
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by seejay2

I'm sorry, Tom. I'm screwing up. I'm running two different places together. CAP was in two different locations:
The first one was about 5 blocks north of HHS at 5503 Calumet, then it moved south, in the 70's, to a location 2 or 3 blocks north of the expressway.

The junkyard was "Calumet Auto Wrecking", I.believe. That was located at the south end of the 9-span...Cj



No problem, Chris. I knew I didn't remember a junkyard on Calumet, but an auto parts store by the name Calumet Auto Parts not too far from HHS does definitely sound familiar.

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!


Reply author: Alan Vandever
Replied on: 07/15/2008 17:57:00
Message:

Wow! A shot of the Hammond Times. I worked out of that building for 10 years, from 1968 to 1978 as a press photographer. The head photographer was Dick Rudzinski. Before that I worked at Millikan's dept store as the photo dept. manager. Ah, those were the good ol'e days.
I've posted on some other threads but I'll say here as well, I was very good friends with Randy Shepherd, Jean's younger brother. He lived in Highland at that time. We had our own little "rat pack".
There was Randy, Tom Roop, George and Bob Anderson, (brothers) and myself, Al Vandever. We hung out at the Big Wheel restaurant on Indianapolis Blvd.
Here is a pic of Randy sitting in his Rolls from 1968.
http://i117.photobucket.com/albums/o72/alanvandever/RandywithRolls.jpg
And yes, he looks a lot like Jean.
Al.


Reply author: Alan Vandever
Replied on: 07/15/2008 18:02:28
Message:

Does anyone remember Kenny Mae's Seven Seas Lounge. Boy, do I have stories about that place.
How about Bodie's photography studio.
All these pictures sure bring to mind a lot of memories.
Al.


Reply author: Alan Vandever
Replied on: 07/15/2008 18:16:03
Message:

Wow! That aerial is confusing. If I rememer correctly, Minas' was on the west side of Hohman Ave, but I can't remember the cross street. I'm pretty sure it was south of State ST. The Hammond times building was at the NE corner of Fayette and Homan. I think a lot of those buildings are miss marked. I can tell you 21 is not the Times building, unless I'm looking at it from the wrong direction, but it looks like the photo is facing northwest.


Reply author: wvcogs
Replied on: 07/15/2008 20:05:01
Message:

Hello Alan,
Everyone who graduated from high school in Hammond for many years remembers the Bodie studios on the second floor of the Indiana Hotel. He seemed to have a monopoly on senior pictures. All members of the class of 1960 at Morton had their senior photos taken by Bodie. A photographer who worked for him took the club and activity group photos for the yearbook.
Minas was on the south side of State Street. That was Goldblatt's on the west side of Hohman.
Ken....


Reply author: Alan Vandever
Replied on: 07/15/2008 20:57:56
Message:

The other photographer you're talking about was probably Harry Dudzik. He worked for Bodie for many years and finally took it over and moved the studio to Highland. He eventually retired and moved to Vegas to live with his brother.
Now that you mention it, I do remember Minas' on State street right across from Millikans. Now that aerial shot makes more sense. Thank you. It's been a long time since I was in down town Hammond, 1978 to be exact.


Reply author: Alan Vandever
Replied on: 07/16/2008 12:02:32
Message:

I have to apologize. #21 in the aeriel photo is indeed the Hammond Times building. I was thinking the building was right on the corner of Fayette and Hohman, but it was the second building back from Hohman ave. The parking lot was directly across the street. It's been along time. I left the Times in 1978 and haven't been back to Hammond since.
Also, I wonder if anyone knows when the pic of the Times building was taken. I'm wondering if the 57 Chevy in front could be mine. I had one when I first started working there.


Reply author: wvcogs
Replied on: 07/16/2008 13:12:33
Message:

Alan,
That photo of the Times building appeared in a promotional booklet published by the Hammond Chamber of Commerce in 1966. Sorry.
Ken...


Reply author: wvcogs
Replied on: 07/16/2008 13:29:55
Message:

Alan,
This photo of the Bodie photog appeared in the 1957 Morton yearbook. Is this Harry? Sorry about the quality. It was printed inside the back cover with a lot of other small pics at very low contrast. By the way, I have one of those "wonderful" 4x5s in my collection.
Ken
http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g268/wvcogs72/Bodie.jpg


Reply author: Alan Vandever
Replied on: 07/16/2008 14:24:30
Message:

Wow! I thought I knew all of the local photographers. Of course 1957 is a little before my time, but I don't recognize that guy at all. Johnny Warroe,(sp) worked for Bodie around that time but that's not him either. It's not Harry. Harry was about 5ft.6" tall, bald with a stocky build.
A couple of facts about Bodie. I don't know how many know how famous Bodie was. If you've seen the label of Four Roses Whiskey, Bodie took the photo for it. He also invented and held the patent on the Carousel slide projector that Kodak marketed for many years. That's how he was able to retire to his home in the dunes.
When Harry was moving the studio from Hammond to Highland, he, Tom Roop, and I went through Bodie's archives of photos. Some of them went all the back to glass slides instead of film. Harry donated them to the Hammond historical society. He had so much history in that studio it was unbelievable.


Reply author: Paddy
Replied on: 12/14/2008 18:40:18
Message:

quote:
[

I sold suits parttime at Jack Fox in '63 and '64 when I was attending Purdue Calumet. Downtown was still thriving in those days. I moved to Minnesota after I graduated from Purdue Calumet in 1968, so I was not witness to the decline. On a recent trip back to Hammond for a funeral, I drove around downtown to mentally revisit so many places that were significant to me. All Saints School, where I attended grades 1-8, still stands but closed decades ago. The Nickel Plate tracks ran right behind the school, and I was able to see the tops of the steam engines as they passed by.

Cataldi's Restaurant was just north of All Saints on State Avenue, and is long gone.

In my high school years, I frequented a pool hall on State Street. It was north of Hohman and across the street from the Greyhound bus terminal.

Goldblatt's stands out in my memory, as it does with anyone who grew up in Hammond's heyday. We didn't own a car then, and grocery shopping involved going with my mother to Goldblatt's and helping carry the groceries home on the bus.

We bought our shoes at Goldblatt's, which used the latest technology available to measure shoe size, a flouroscope that revealed your bones. It was an amazing thing to see inside part of your body, but the federal government ruined the fun when it banned the machines over concerns about the x-rays causing cancer.


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 12/14/2008 21:00:59
Message:

Paddy:

I guess we must have been at Purdue Calumet at the same time for one year. I was there during the 1967-1968 school year, which was my freshman year, and then I went down to W. Lafayette for my last three years.

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!


Reply author: Paddy
Replied on: 12/14/2008 22:02:15
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Tom J

Paddy:

I guess we must have been at Purdue Calumet at the same time for one year.
Yep. I graduated with a BA in Sociology, worked for a few months for the feds in Chicago and Gary, and then got a fellowship for grad school at the U. of Minnesota.

When I was back in Hammond, I drove through the PUC campus and didn't recognize any of it. The growth amazed me. We were all commuters back in the day, and now there are dorms. Truly amazing.


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 12/15/2008 18:58:38
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Paddy

quote:
Originally posted by Tom J

Paddy:

I guess we must have been at Purdue Calumet at the same time for one year.
Yep. I graduated with a BA in Sociology, worked for a few months for the feds in Chicago and Gary, and then got a fellowship for grad school at the U. of Minnesota.

When I was back in Hammond, I drove through the PUC campus and didn't recognize any of it. The growth amazed me. We were all commuters back in the day, and now there are dorms. Truly amazing.



Same here, Paddy. I saw the PUC campus on August 18, 2006, for the first time since the late 60s or early 70s, and I was blown away by the size of the place and the number of buildings. We had one building, or, actually, two inter-connected buildings, I guess, in the 1967-1968 school year. They had 14 buildings in 2006!

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!


Reply author: Paddy
Replied on: 12/15/2008 22:26:10
Message:

Did you run into Charlie Tinkham while you were there? He taught English composition.


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 12/16/2008 07:44:18
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Paddy

Did you run into Charlie Tinkham while you were there? He taught English composition.



That name is not familiar to me, Paddy.

I don't remember any of the names of my professors for that first year of college.

What I remember is that my calculus prof loved to use the expression "It is intuitively obvious to the casual observer" when he was solving equations. Well, I guess it wasn't too obvious to this casual obsever, because I flunked that class.

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!


Reply author: duane
Replied on: 12/19/2008 14:06:36
Message:

One thing, regardless of the economy, that you can count on....Colleges and Hospitals will always grow in size. Ever visit a college campus or hospital after being away for 5 years and not find a new building or wing??

During the early 1970's PUCC went through a growth spurt. They added the student union, engineering, and a classroom/office building (I think that was actually its name!) But as when you attended, there were NO dorms. It was a commuter college...and if you wanted the whole on-campus or Greek thing, you went to W. Lafayette.

One professor I remember for Chem 111 and Chem 112 was the notorious Harlan D. Phayle. He had a lecture hall of about 200 kids and he did fail roughly half of them from his classes. So his name suited him!

But Purdue is not alone. I used to live right next to the Univ. of Minnesota at Duluth back in the early 1980's. Very much like PUCC it was predominantly a commuter college, although it did have a few dorms. After being away for about 15 years and then moving back, I can't even find my way around on that campus any longer...probably about 10 new class buildings and dorm buildings everywhere.


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 12/19/2008 18:32:05
Message:

Oh, I remember that name, Dr. Phayle, but I'm not sure I had him for my chemistry class. I dropped Chem at the last minute to prevent getting a grade, which would have been an F. Do you get the impression that I was not a "model student?"

I had Chem 115, not Chem 111. Did Phayle teach Engineering Chem also?

I flunked Calculus, a 5 hr. course, I dropped Chem, a 4 hr. course, and I got a D in something else. I only earned 9 credits for the semester out of the 18 credit hour load I started with.

WHY did they put me in an Engineering Math class and an Engineering Chemistry class???? I was a FORESTRY major, for Pete's sake!

I was put on probation, of course. My poor dad. He should have kicked my butt BIG TIME; he worked so hard to pay for my education and then I messed up like that. I don't remember him making a big deal of it, but I know he was disappointed. I came back in the spring semester with a B average.

Tom

EDIT: Just checked my transcript. I did NOT get a D that first semester. I withdrew from Chem 115 and flunked Math 161, but my other three grades were an A, a B, and a C.

quote:
Originally posted by duane

One thing, regardless of the economy, that you can count on....Colleges and Hospitals will always grow in size. Ever visit a college campus or hospital after being away for 5 years and not find a new building or wing??

During the early 1970's PUCC went through a growth spurt. They added the student union, engineering, and a classroom/office building (I think that was actually its name!) But as when you attended, there were NO dorms. It was a commuter college...and if you wanted the whole on-campus or Greek thing, you went to W. Lafayette.

One professor I remember for Chem 111 and Chem 112 was the notorious Harlan D. Phayle. He had a lecture hall of about 200 kids and he did fail roughly half of them from his classes. So his name suited him!

But Purdue is not alone. I used to live right next to the Univ. of Minnesota at Duluth back in the early 1980's. Very much like PUCC it was predominantly a commuter college, although it did have a few dorms. After being away for about 15 years and then moving back, I can't even find my way around on that campus any longer...probably about 10 new class buildings and dorm buildings everywhere.



A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!


Reply author: tom w
Replied on: 03/09/2009 20:02:31
Message:

I happened to notice that in your areal photo, I see the building that I went to for Hammond Tech's aviation shop. They leased the building from Borden Dairy for a few semesters. It's the square building on the left side of the photo just south of the tracks. You will see Borden's trucks in their lot and the building between the lot and Gluth (sp?) Roofing. On the corner of that street and Hohman Ave is the Yale Building. Also does anyone remember the Pig Sandwich Shop on State St. just west of L. Fish furniture and the bank? I worked there part-time while in high school. Take Care all.

Tom W Hammond Tech 55-58


Reply author: Paddy
Replied on: 03/09/2009 21:19:34
Message:

Borden's Dairy brings back a lot of memories. Back when I was in grade school and lived on Harrison Avenue, we could stop at the loading dock at Borden's on our way home and get a pint of ice-cold chocolate milk for a mere nickel.


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 03/10/2009 06:17:36
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by tom w

I happened to notice that in your areal photo, I see the building that I went to for Hammond Tech's aviation shop. They leased the building from Borden Dairy for a few semesters. It's the square building on the left side of the photo just south of the tracks. You will see Borden's trucks in their lot and the building between the lot and Gluth (sp?) Roofing. On the corner of that street and Hohman Ave is the Yale Building. Also does anyone remember the Pig Sandwich Shop on State St. just west of L. Fish furniture and the bank? I worked there part-time while in high school. Take Care all.

Tom W Hammond Tech 55-58



Welcome, Tom W! Glad you have joined us, and thanks for your contribution to this thread.

Sure, I remember the Pig. I'm sure I ate there a few times, but I have only vague recollections.

Did you know any of the Minas employees? My dad worked there for something like 37 years.

Please, share some of your memories of Downtown!

Tom J

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!


Reply author: duane
Replied on: 03/10/2009 19:22:48
Message:

Your discussion of places to eat reminded me of a Chinese Restaurant which, I believe was located either in or nearby the old courthouse building. I think it was called Cam Lam's and I recall going there several times with my Mom. This would have been late 1960's or early 1970's. Anyone remember that place?

Also, as long back as I can remember, the Old Courthouse was always a dark black, but I think that was probably just weathering and pollution. Does anyone remember if this building was red sandstone or did anyone ever see it when it was cleaned up?


Reply author: Bill Bucko
Replied on: 03/11/2009 01:52:12
Message:

The old courthouse is a haunting memory from my childhood. Haunting, because I saw it so seldom--on most visits to downtown it was totally blocked out by the huge Goldblatt's building just to the north--and on the rare occasions when I did glimpse it, it loomed up, suddenly revealed, impossibly tall to a 4 or 5 year old kid, like some fairy-tale castle (which the tall tower certainly made it resemble).

In the mid-1950s, which is when I saw it, the stone was all weathered and darkened --steps, walls, tower, everything.

Bill

Warren G. Harding Class of '63


Reply author: tom w
Replied on: 03/11/2009 04:31:11
Message:

Just two quick replies. Yes, my Aunt Elsie worked in the woman's department at Minas and I used to go to Cam Lan a lot. It was on Sibley behind Goldblatts. When Goldblatt closed, Cam Lan moved to Highland on Indianapolis Blvd. almost across from the Blue-Top. I still have a incense burner that the owner of Cam Lan gave me for good luck when I told him that I would be gone for a week to get my eyes operated on. Anyone remember a tavern one block south of Douglas and Hohman next to Schmusser Buick's used car lot? Heres a hint: next to Calumet Auto Parts, used to be Joe and Ernie's. Take care all.
Tom W Hammond Tech 55-58


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 03/11/2009 06:48:22
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by tom w

Just two quick replies. Yes, my Aunt Elsie worked in the woman's department at Minas and I used to go to Cam Lan a lot. It was on Sibley behind Goldblatts. When Goldblatt closed, Cam Lan moved to Highland on Indianapolis Blvd. almost across from the Blue-Top. I still have a incense burner that the owner of Cam Lan gave me for good luck when I told him that I would be gone for a week to get my eyes operated on. Anyone remember a tavern one block south of Douglas and Hohman next to Schmusser Buick's used car lot? Heres a hint: next to Calumet Auto Parts, used to be Joe and Ernie's. Take care all.
Tom W Hammond Tech 55-58



Cool, Tom! I know that my dad must have known your mom. Do you remember Paul Johnson from the parking lot? Dad ran the parking lot and, after it was built, the parking garage for the Minas Store.

I think a classmate of mine, Kelly Sang, is the son of the owner of the Cam Lam. I've been trying to get Kelly to join us here.

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!


Reply author: tom w
Replied on: 03/12/2009 07:33:08
Message:

Yes Bill, I remember your father well. I could never figure out how he piled up the snow in the parking lot every year for the "Guess the day that the snowpile disappears" contest with one arm!! Do you remember the east end of the Minas block? There was L Fish Furniture on one corner. Post Office on one, Berry Brothers on one and a drugstore on one. What was the name of the drug store? Also west of the drug store was a little wooden building that housed a shoe repair and a hat store. The building was soo old that you had to walk up three or four stairs to get in. Take care all.
Tom W Hammond Tech 55-58


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 03/12/2009 18:01:39
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by tom w

Yes Bill, I remember your father well. I could never figure out how he piled up the snow in the parking lot every year for the "Guess the day that the snowpile disappears" contest with one arm!! Do you remember the east end of the Minas block? There was L Fish Furniture on one corner. Post Office on one, Berry Brothers on one and a drugstore on one. What was the name of the drug store? Also west of the drug store was a little wooden building that housed a shoe repair and a hat store. The building was soo old that you had to walk up three or four stairs to get in. Take care all.
Tom W Hammond Tech 55-58



Tom:

I'm a "Tom," too, not a "Bill."

Oh man, it is SO COOL that you remember my dad! Yeah, it was amazing what he could do with that one arm. He could tie neckties and fishing knots, and as you observed, he could drive a Jeep with a manual transmission and a snow plow.

The drug store was Stoltz Drugs. Next to Stoltz on the west side was Gene's restaurant, where a lot of the Minas people, my dad included, would eat lunch. The Minas Store was next. I don't remember the shoe shop you mentioned, but maybe it had closed and its space had been absorbed by the Minas Store by the time I was old enough to remember. I do remember the other places you mentioned that were on that corner or near it. There was also a Kwicki Snak Diner just east of the post office, wasn't there? It was sort of like a silver railroad car.

It would be fun to exchange Emails and/or phone calls with you. If you would like to Email me, please feel free to do so through Sheptalk.

Tom


A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!


Reply author: tom w
Replied on: 03/12/2009 21:00:05
Message:

The Gene from Genes restaurant used to be the manager of the Pig which was owned by Gil Fitch. Great guys. Kwiki Snax had 2 places Bill. The other one was by the hospital on Hohman Ave. They were white on the outside and white and chrome on the inside.Both owned by the same nice couple. As I remember your dad, he wore blue striped Minas shirts and a policeman like hat cocked over to one side. Take care all.
Tom W Hammond Tech 55-58


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 03/12/2009 22:54:02
Message:

Like this?



You DO remember my dad, don't you?

I remember Dad wearing solid color shirts, but in this picture, which was probably taken about the time I was born, it does look like there might be a striped pattern in the shirt. I guess they changed styles to the solid color by the time I was old enough to remember. They also added a little rubber or plastic bow tie to the "uniform," because I remember Dad wearing one all the time when he was working. They had elastic straps to hold them in place.

"Bill"



A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!


Reply author: duane
Replied on: 03/13/2009 21:52:35
Message:

Great picture of your Dad, Tom....especially the "Love, Dad"
What a treasure.


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 03/14/2009 06:10:12
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by duane

Great picture of your Dad, Tom....especially the "Love, Dad"
What a treasure.



Thanks, Duane.

You're right: old pictures of people and places that we love are indeed a treasure. We all wish more pictures had been taken back in those "good old days," don't we?

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!


Reply author: seejay2
Replied on: 03/14/2009 12:41:33
Message:

Be thankful if you have even one. My wife came from Pennsylvania and they had a huge flood in '72, I believe. The family lost everything. She still rues over the pix that were forever lost---which was all of them.
On the other hand, I have so many boxes of my family pix and movies, I wonder if they aren't worse than lost sometimes when I go looking for things.....Cj


Reply author: tom w
Replied on: 03/14/2009 18:06:59
Message:

Well,at least I know that my memoriy is still o.k. huh? You are right about the photos.Treasure those photos though guys cause sometimes life gets lonely. On a cheerful note, does anyone remember Joe Hirsch and Son before they moved to Woodmar or Montgomery Ward downtown? How about the bus starter in front of Armstrong Jewelers? Take care all. Tom W Hammond Tech 55-58


Reply author: FloridaKelly
Replied on: 03/15/2009 12:23:55
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Tom J

quote:
Originally posted by tom w

Just two quick replies. Yes, my Aunt Elsie worked in the woman's department at Minas and I used to go to Cam Lan a lot. It was on Sibley behind Goldblatts. When Goldblatt closed, Cam Lan moved to Highland on Indianapolis Blvd. almost across from the Blue-Top. I still have a incense burner that the owner of Cam Lan gave me for good luck when I told him that I would be gone for a week to get my eyes operated on. Anyone remember a tavern one block south of Douglas and Hohman next to Schmusser Buick's used car lot? Heres a hint: next to Calumet Auto Parts, used to be Joe and Ernie's. Take care all.
Tom W Hammond Tech 55-58
Tom W,
You and your Aunt must have frequented my Dad's restaurant often. My Dad did close Cam Lan in 1968. He reopened Ho Sai Gai in Highland adjacent to Miner Dunn in 1969. My Dad always knew his customers by what they ordered. What was you favorite dish? Did you like sitting in the booths?



Cool, Tom! I know that my dad must have known your mom. Do you remember Paul Johnson from the parking lot? Dad ran the parking lot and, after it was built, the parking garage for the Minas Store.

I think a classmate of mine, Kelly Sang, is the son of the owner of the Cam Lam. I've been trying to get Kelly to join us here.

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!




Reply author: tom w
Replied on: 03/15/2009 15:46:54
Message:

Kelly Sang
I remember the private booths most of all. I enjoyed sipping tea in the booths most of all. The incense burner now sits on a table so
that its the first thing you see when you come in my house. Always has been. this is a very ornate little brass 2 piece burner with many dragons and keystones decorating it. probably one of the most cherished of my posessions. I loved his Egg Foo Young then and still do now. His gift and care for a complete unknown like myself just blew me away and I'm sure any good luck that I've had during my life, had some connection to that burner. Thanks for the reply.
Take care Tom W Hammond Tech 55-58


Reply author: FloridaKelly
Replied on: 03/16/2009 07:27:53
Message:

Hi Duane,

My name is Kelly Sang and My Dad owned Cam Lan Restaurant. His original restaurant was located in the 5200 block of Hohman Ave. He relocated it to 132 Sibley in 1952 about 3-4 stores west of Goldblatts.
Did you eat @ Cam Lan? What was your favorite dish? My Dad always remember what people ordered, but not their names so much. Did you like sitting in the booths or out in the open area?
My Dad closed Cam Lan in 1968 and reopened Ho Sai Gai Restaurant in 1969 in Highland next to Miner Dunn.

quote:
Originally posted by duane

Your discussion of places to eat reminded me of a Chinese Restaurant which, I believe was located either in or nearby the old courthouse building. I think it was called Cam Lam's and I recall going there several times with my Mom. This would have been late 1960's or early 1970's. Anyone remember that place?

Also, as long back as I can remember, the Old Courthouse was always a dark black, but I think that was probably just weathering and pollution. Does anyone remember if this building was red sandstone or did anyone ever see it when it was cleaned up?


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 03/16/2009 08:09:19
Message:

Kelly:

Thanks for the info on your dad's restaurant.

I am so happy that you have joined us here!

For the benefit of my fellow Region Rats here at Sheptalk, Kelly and I go all the way back to Washington Jr. High School.

Tom

A 1967 Graduate of Hammond High who cherishes his memories of growing up in the Hammond of the 1950's and 1960's. Bring back those days!


Reply author: duane
Replied on: 03/16/2009 20:11:05
Message:

HI Kelly. Nice to have you on this forum.
Yes, I ate at Cam Lam's. I wasn't a regular, but went there frequently. Probably my most frequent order was vegetable Chop Suey, as I tended to stay away from meat more often back then.

The booths, of course.

My thanks to your family for giving my family such good times, and for giving me such good memories.


Reply author: FloridaKelly
Replied on: 03/16/2009 20:22:46
Message:

Cam Lan Owner Restaurant, Charlie Sang, with 2 employees circa 1950 in beautiful downtown Hammond.



Reply author: tom w
Replied on: 03/17/2009 00:59:24
Message:

Kelly
I was just about to write that I remember your father was called Charlie and his picture pops up. Also, if you are now in Florida, we may STILL be neighbors. Talk about coencidence! Tom W Hammond Tech 55-58


Reply author: FloridaKelly
Replied on: 03/17/2009 16:03:30
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by tom w

Kelly
I was just about to write that I remember your father was called Charlie and his picture pops up. Also, if you are now in Florida, we may STILL be neighbors. Talk about coencidence! Tom W Hammond Tech 55-58



Tom,

It's great that you have kept that incense burner for all these years. Seems like it has brought you good luck and health.
Tom J turned me on to MAHP's dvd of Hammond in the 60's. I was able to see what my Dad's restaurant looked like from the outside. I do not have any exterior pictures of the restaurant. It was cool to go down the street of Hammond again. It's amazing how much I have forgotten about downtown.
I live in Orlando. What town do you live in?
Thanks for the memories.

Kelly


Reply author: tom w
Replied on: 03/17/2009 19:52:53
Message:

Kelly
I also live in O-town. I'm retired from from county govt. I now paint and work with wood. I used to have an office at Dizzy World. I would like to chat with Charlie's son. Amazing huh? Take care. Tom W Hammond Tech 55-58


Reply author: duane
Replied on: 03/17/2009 20:03:47
Message:

Thanks for the photo of your Dad and Cam Lan!
What were the two colors of the tiles on the floor....they look just like the pattern that my folks had in their kitchen!


Reply author: FloridaKelly
Replied on: 03/18/2009 05:23:18
Message:

Hi Duane,

From what I can remember, the tiles were maybe like a darkish marble brown. As for the lighter color tile, I don't have a clue.

Thanks for the kind words about my Dad and his restaurant. I guess this is what's it all about....memories.


Reply author: Jim R
Replied on: 03/18/2009 23:08:48
Message:

We had that same pattern on our kitchen floor, in gray and light pink. Must have been popular back then.

Harding K thru 7
Morton 8 thru 12


Reply author: duane
Replied on: 03/19/2009 18:17:32
Message:

Ditto Jim. But our kitchen was grey and red! And our church had the same pattern and color in their narthex.


Reply author: FloridaKelly
Replied on: 03/27/2009 18:58:51
Message:

[quote]Originally posted by tom w

Well,at least I know that my memoriy is still o.k. huh? You are right about the photos.Treasure those photos though guys cause sometimes life gets lonely. On a cheerful note, does anyone remember Joe Hirsch and Son before they moved to Woodmar or Montgomery Ward downtown? How about the bus starter in front of Armstrong Jewelers? Take care all. Tom W Hammond Tech 55-58

Hi Tom,

I use to shop @ Joe Hirsch. Bob Hirsch just passed away a few years ago.
Didn't Hirsch use to be right next to the old court house? Then they moved it to the SW corner of the next street (Muenich CT) south of the court house or was it the other way around? Been a long time. They use to have the best clothes around.
Do you remember the sales people? I remember Bob McGoughlin, Don Biddings and a tall skinny guy by the name of Ray I think.


Reply author: tom w
Replied on: 03/28/2009 03:50:47
Message:

Florida Kelly
JEEZOMAN what a esquisite memory. Better than mine, I dare say! They were just south of the courthouse but there was a women's store in between. They were across the street from Monkey Ward. When they moved to Woodmar and the place turned into a restaurant with pink boothes, I found a 1879 silver dollar in the middle of the street one rainy night right in front of the place.
I could never remember the salesmen's names though. That was a "Just Lookin" store for me. I would go in to see what was new in mens fashion then go to Goldblatts and buy it. LOL Take care. Tom W
Hammond Tech 55-58


Reply author: rmkekeis
Replied on: 08/09/2009 22:35:44
Message:

I miss the old Hammond downtown and Goldblatt's. My first job was with the Parthenon Theater second was Burger's on Calumet and then back downtown with Sears until I graduated from High School. I did come back years later and work at Hoosier State Bank for a short time. I remember taking the bus a lot, #5 for home and #2 to go out to Wicker Park.

I rode through downtown the other day and wqas sad with the changes that have taken place. I remember River Oaks being the killer of downtown and always wanting a bridge over the RR tracks. Well the bridge is there and everything else is gone.


Reply author: BobK
Replied on: 08/12/2009 19:02:11
Message:

I remember climbing the fence at the new Tech and playing in the plane at the back of the building. I can barely remember them taking down the old Tech building on Hohman.

I went to The Pig for breaks and lunch sometimes when I worked at Hoosier State Bank.

I used to catch the bus home in front of Jack Fox. Wasn't it Joe Hirsh over by the County Courthouse?

Speaking of the courthouse, I remember standing just in front of it, waiting for a bus to Munster to visit my cousin. I was holding a dollar bill out from my hand for some reason and a pigeon decided to wipe out President Washington.

My now wife worked part time for Hoosier Furniture and Appliance, just north of the LaSalle Hotel, during and after high school doing their bookkeeping, Mr and Mrs Kaufman were good people.

Bob


Reply author: BobK
Replied on: 08/12/2009 19:31:44
Message:

Wasn't Kresge's (forerunner to K-mart) on the NE corner of Hohman and Sibley and torn down to build the Penney's store? And wasn't there a Grants in the same block? Or do I have their locations switched? I recall one of them because the #2 bus stopped there and across Sibley beside Woolworth.

I went through what's left of downtown a week or so ago and was surprised to see the hardware store is still there and open. There goes my brain, I can't remember the name of it other than " & sons". I should take a ride back and stop in. I know as soon as I click to post that I'll remember.

Bob


Reply author: BobK
Replied on: 08/12/2009 19:43:38
Message:

I see some of you are now in FL. I'm now down there for the Winters in Avon Park. We bought a home in a retirement community and this coming Winter will be our third year. We've been riding Gold Wing motorcycles since 85 and belong to 4 groups down there and have a scheduled ride almost every day.

Bob


Reply author: BobK
Replied on: 08/12/2009 19:56:25
Message:

I apologize for getting off topic and a bit prior to the 60's.

Bob


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 08/12/2009 20:06:33
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by BobK

Wasn't Kresge's (forerunner to K-mart) on the NE corner of Hohman and Sibley and torn down to build the Penney's store? And wasn't there a Grants in the same block? Or do I have their locations switched? I recall one of them because the #2 bus stopped there and across Sibley beside Woolworth.

I went through what's left of downtown a week or so ago and was surprised to see the hardware store is still there and open. There goes my brain, I can't remember the name of it other than " & sons". I should take a ride back and stop in. I know as soon as I click to post that I'll remember.

Bob




Bob:

I'm not at all sure, but I believe the store that previously occupied the spot where Penny's was built might have been J.J. Newberry's?

I'm pretty sure you are right in thinking that there was a Kresge's on the same side of the street in that same block of Hohman, and I believe it became the "Jupiter Store."

The hardware store on Sibley that is still in business is Mueller's and Son's. They have been in business for a hundred years, or something like that.

Tom


Reply author: BobK
Replied on: 08/12/2009 20:26:07
Message:

Ah! I forgot about Newberry's.

Bob


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 08/12/2009 20:32:37
Message:

I think this has been posted in here before, but here is a link to some good info on the history of Mueller and Sons.

http://www.nwitimes.com/business/local/article_1c887cae-f4e9-5aa3-93fc-3f327312b94b.html


Reply author: BobK
Replied on: 08/12/2009 20:36:58
Message:

This is the Hohman Theater. My Mother worked there before me and that might just be her in the ticket booth. Photo was taken in 1937.


Bob


Reply author: wvcogs
Replied on: 08/12/2009 22:12:48
Message:

One of my dreams would be to go back in time to 1937, the year of those two movies, and walk through the Camera Mart next door to the Hohman.
Ken


Reply author: Carol
Replied on: 08/14/2009 15:04:02
Message:

Hey, BobK, you've got a good memory. Grant's was there and my mother and alot of her friends worked there before the war.


Reply author: BobK
Replied on: 08/14/2009 16:27:03
Message:

It's only long term good, short term sucks.

Bob


Reply author: Carol
Replied on: 08/14/2009 16:40:25
Message:

Okay, let's get your long term warmed up.What was the name of the Catholic church across from the Paramont? At least I think it was. My long term isn't as good as yours. It might have been closer to Goldblatts and the Courthouse.


Reply author: BobK
Replied on: 08/14/2009 16:57:58
Message:

I mentioned Art's in another thread. Art's was part of our Drive-in cruising when I was a teen. Kelly's, Pow Wow and Art's but we hung mostly at Kelly's.


I lived on the north side then and also went to Madura's Danceland and sock hops at Irving school and I didn't know how to dance. Still don't.

Bob


Reply author: Carol
Replied on: 08/14/2009 17:05:53
Message:

Sorry about the mixing of threads! I'm still trying to get the hang of this. I edited my question becase I realized this thread was just for downtown. Which thread did you mention Art's & Kelley's? I was a carhop at Kelly's. Made very good $ for back then. You guys were pretty generous as alot of you were on strike. North Side, huh? I married a guy from the North Side: Ken Peterson. His mother owned the Ideal Mattress Shop on Calumet (49 hundred block, I think).


Reply author: BobK
Replied on: 08/14/2009 17:36:55
Message:

I'm new here too and have been mixing. I think we're about the same age. I was in the 1960 class of Hammond High.

Bob


Reply author: Carol
Replied on: 08/14/2009 17:44:54
Message:

Well I edited my reply again. I have to stop doing that! I'm glad I'm not the only new person! You seem to have caught on quite well.

I'm a 1960 grad of Morton High, so I imagine we are the same age. I was a mid-term grad, so I got out in February. How did you post your picture?


Reply author: BobK
Replied on: 08/15/2009 08:02:18
Message:

The church was/is St Joseph's.

Bob


Reply author: Carol
Replied on: 08/15/2009 11:33:02
Message:

Thanks again, Bob.


Reply author: ChuckR
Replied on: 08/17/2009 18:06:19
Message:

My goodness, does the picture of the Hohman Theatre bring back memories. I recall many a Saturday catching the #1 bus at Jackson and Vine with 35 cents in my pocket. Bus rides were a nickle and the show was 12 cents leaving change for popcorn or candy. I remember we would watch three westerns with cowboys such as The Durango Kid, Johnny Mack Brown etc. plus the serial and cartoon. Our moms sure knew how to get a quiet Saturday when they sent us to the Hohman. Other theatres we went to were the Paramont (loved the caramel corn from corner store), Orpheum (seemed like all shows were military genre)and,of course, The Parthenon near Penny's and the Walgreen's on Hohman. I use to walk down the alley west after a show at the Parthenon to the rear door of Solon's Tap on Sibley where my father played the piano and tended bar. The waitress would always sit me down in the kitchen area for a piece of pie and drink. Dad used to take me on Sunday's to sit at the bar to watch baseball before we had our own tv at home. Ah, the memories.


Reply author: BobK
Replied on: 08/18/2009 20:01:54
Message:

I had an Aunt & Uncle and my close cousins that lived at 505 Vine St on the corner of Harrison and Vine.


Reply author: Paddy
Replied on: 08/18/2009 21:02:55
Message:

quote:
Bus rides were a nickle and the show was 12 cents leaving change for popcorn or candy.
I sometimes spent a dime on the vending machines that dispensed soft drinks. Three things had to happen in order to get your drink. First, the paper cup had to drop into place. If it did not, which was often, you would watch helplessly as your drink dispensed right into the drain.

Even if the cup arrived before the dispensing began, two other problems could occur. Either the "soda water" or the syrup dispenser could fizzle, leaving you with a dime's worth of really weird or totally undrinkable stuff.


Reply author: BobK
Replied on: 08/19/2009 10:34:34
Message:

Coffee machines were the same. You got a cup of black coffee or a cup with cream and sugar.


I sure do miss Goldblatt's. I ran across this http://www.hammondindiana.com/20thcentury/time_capsule19.htm
http://www.hhs59.com/lion.htm

Bob


Reply author: wvcogs
Replied on: 08/27/2009 11:56:22
Message:

The east side of Hohman Avenue from Fayette Steeet to Sibley, or Jack Fox and Sons to Woolworth's -- Here's a picture of how that block looks today. The picture was posted on Webshots.com by ajschicubs85. For those who have not seen his albums, he has many photos of how Hammond was and how it is now. Then, click on the second link to see the same block in 1967 in a picture he posted earlier from a Chamber of Commerce publicity booklet that was published that year.

Ken...

Fayette to Sibley

Fayette to Sibley in 1967


Reply author: Pro2am
Replied on: 09/02/2009 23:04:08
Message:

Ken,

I wonder if that camera store eventually became Dave's Camera Mart, or if was a separate business?

Mike Rapchak Jr.

==============================

quote:
Originally posted by wvcogs

One of my dreams would be to go back in time to 1937, the year of those two movies, and walk through the Camera Mart next door to the Hohman.
Ken


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 09/03/2009 07:39:30
Message:

Mr. Edgar Peglow, the last president of the Edward C. Minas Company before its demise, died yesterday, Wednesday, September 2, 2009.

My dad worked at Minas's for 37 years, and I knew Mr. Peglow from the store.

Here's a link to his obit.

http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/nwitimes/obituary.aspx?n=edgar-l-peglow&pid=132210533

Tom


Reply author: Jay
Replied on: 12/07/2009 14:27:39
Message:

The cookies in the basement of Goldblatt's bring back memories. We used to purchase them in bulk on sale days. Imagine that ... a kid (me) getting tired of cookies! Well what do you expect when your parents purchase bags and bags of them just cause they were on sale. And we could not store them at home for too long otherwise they got soft and tasted "different".

But my most vivid memory of Goldblatt's was that darn intermittent clanging that I would hear. I'm not sure if it was coming over loudspeakers or what.
Sometimes you would hear one clang, followed by two clangs. Or you would hear some other combination of clangs. Then it would stop.
It sounded like morse code to me. Does anyone have a clue of what it was used for?
I swear that everytime I think of Goldblatt's, I hear that clanging in my head!

I remember the last time we went shopping at Goldblatt's. We purchased a brand new 10 speed bicycle for me. In fact, I still have it and it looks brand new (I hardly used it because I had older bikes).


Reply author: Jim Plummer
Replied on: 12/08/2009 07:55:08
Message:

I spent a lot of time in there. Remember Baby Dumpling, the world's only 450 lb. go-go dancer? one of my friends took her out to breakfast once. He said she ate three breakfasts at one time!. I was in the current location on Calumet ave. several years back and it seemed like there were more women than customers.

quote:
Originally posted by Alan Vandever

Does anyone remember Kenny Mae's Seven Seas Lounge. Boy, do I have stories about that place.
How about Bodie's photography studio.
All these pictures sure bring to mind a lot of memories.
Al.


Reply author: BobK
Replied on: 12/08/2009 15:55:56
Message:

Jay, the bong sound was code much as todays stores have code too. Today they usually use a number code over the PA system. When we were in Whiting for the Pirogi Fest this past year there was a booth of history items from the area including CD's. They had one of the bongers from Goldblatt's but I don't remember how much they wanted for it but it was too pricey for me.

Bob


Reply author: Jay
Replied on: 12/13/2009 23:40:10
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by BobK

Jay, the bong sound was code much as todays stores have code too. Today they usually use a number code over the PA system. When we were in Whiting for the Pirogi Fest this past year there was a booth of history items from the area including CD's. They had one of the bongers from Goldblatt's but I don't remember how much they wanted for it but it was too pricey for me.

Bob




Wow, look at what I found at YouTube !
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gq4MnSCSWEo


Reply author: BobK
Replied on: 12/14/2009 07:28:35
Message:

That's the one.

Bob


Reply author: Jim Plummer
Replied on: 12/14/2009 08:14:40
Message:

This site is truly magical!!!!!!!

quote:
Originally posted by Jay

quote:
Originally posted by BobK

Jay, the bong sound was code much as todays stores have code too. Today they usually use a number code over the PA system. When we were in Whiting for the Pirogi Fest this past year there was a booth of history items from the area including CD's. They had one of the bongers from Goldblatt's but I don't remember how much they wanted for it but it was too pricey for me.

Bob




Wow, look at what I found at YouTube !
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gq4MnSCSWEo


Reply author: BobK
Replied on: 12/23/2009 06:30:05
Message:

http://www.nwitimes.com/news/local/lake/article_e2b7344f-17a1-5bdc-83e2-d38c0a2ba16f.html

Bob


Reply author: Tom J
Replied on: 12/23/2009 06:48:48
Message:

Cool, Bob, thanks for the link.

Tom


Reply author: nitti
Replied on: 12/31/2009 10:11:26
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Jay

The cookies in the basement of Goldblatt's bring back memories. We used to purchase them in bulk on sale days. Imagine that ... a kid (me) getting tired of cookies! Well what do you expect when your parents purchase bags and bags of them just cause they were on sale. And we could not store them at home for too long otherwise they got soft and tasted "different".

But my most vivid memory of Goldblatt's was that darn intermittent clanging that I would hear. I'm not sure if it was coming over loudspeakers or what.
Sometimes you would hear one clang, followed by two clangs. Or you would hear some other combination of clangs. Then it would stop.
It sounded like morse code to me. Does anyone have a clue of what it was used for?
I swear that everytime I think of Goldblatt's, I hear that clanging in my head!

I remember the last time we went shopping at Goldblatt's. We purchased a brand new 10 speed bicycle for me. In fact, I still have it and it looks brand new (I hardly used it because I had older bikes).

Goldblatt's basement...if memory serves, they used to have a stand that sold great Kosher Hot dogs and Polish sausage. I had one almost every time I went downtown.

I remember Christmas shopping downtown at 5-6 yrs old. I got my foot caught in the tracks (started a phobia that I have until this day) while walking from Hohman toward Minas. I remember a shoe store store between Minas and the tracks. Does anyone know it's name.

On an Easter trip to that store, I lost a tooth biting one of the colored marshmallow eggs with the relatively hard shell. Haven't been able to eat another one to this day.........


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